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It's Not What You Know, but How You Use It: Statistical Knowledge and Adolescent Problem Gambling

Delfabbro, Paul Howard; Lahn, Julie; Grabosky, Peter

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This paper examined the nature of irrational gambling-related cognitions in a sample of 926 adolescents (mean age = 14.5 years) sampled from Australian schools. Students were differentiated according to gambling status and administered a series of items that assessed their understanding of objective odds, the nature of randomness, the role of skill in gambling, and the perceived profitability of gambling. The results confirmed previous findings that problem gamblers tend to be more irrational...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorDelfabbro, Paul Howard
dc.contributor.authorLahn, Julie
dc.contributor.authorGrabosky, Peter
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-07T22:45:09Z
dc.identifier.issn1050-5350
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/25495
dc.description.abstractThis paper examined the nature of irrational gambling-related cognitions in a sample of 926 adolescents (mean age = 14.5 years) sampled from Australian schools. Students were differentiated according to gambling status and administered a series of items that assessed their understanding of objective odds, the nature of randomness, the role of skill in gambling, and the perceived profitability of gambling. The results confirmed previous findings that problem gamblers tend to be more irrational in their perceptions, as indicated by stronger beliefs in the role of skilful play in chance activities, and that gambling is a potentially profitable activity. However, counter intuitively, problem gamblers did not appear to have any poorer understanding of objective probabilities. These results are discussed in terms of Sevigny and Ladouceur's (2004) concept of cognitive switching as well as psychological research concerning the role of emotional and motivational factors in the development of an illusion of control. The implications of these findings for gambling education programs are discussed.
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.sourceJournal of Gambling Studies
dc.subjectKeywords: addiction; adolescent; article; attitude to health; Australia; child behavior; control; defense mechanism; female; high risk behavior; human; male; pathological gambling; peer group; psychological aspect; recurrent disease; statistics; student; Adolescent Adolescents; Cognitions; Irrational; Problem gambling
dc.titleIt's Not What You Know, but How You Use It: Statistical Knowledge and Adolescent Problem Gambling
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume22
dc.date.issued2006
local.identifier.absfor170113 - Social and Community Psychology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9312240xPUB38
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationDelfabbro, Paul Howard, University of Adelaide
local.contributor.affiliationLahn, Julie, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationGrabosky, Peter, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2006
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage179
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage193
local.identifier.doi10.1007/s10899-006-9009-5
dc.date.updated2015-12-07T11:32:45Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-33746843104
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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