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Speciation in the mountains and dispersal by rivers: Molecular phylogeny of Eulamprus water skinks and the biogeography of Eastern Australia

Pepper, Mitzy; Sumner, Joanna; Brennan, Ian; Hodges, Kathryn; Lemmon, Alan R.; Lemmon, Emily Moriarty; Peterson, Garry; Rabosky, Daniel; Schwarzkopf, Lin; Scott, Ian; Shea, Glenn; Keogh, J. Scott

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Aim: To develop a robust phylogeny for the iconic Australian water skinks (Eulamprus) and to explore the influence of landscape evolution of eastern Australia on phylogeographic patterns. Location: Eastern and south-eastern Australia. Methods: We used Sanger methods to sequence a mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) locus for 386 individuals across the five Eulamprus species to elucidate phylogeographic structure. We also sequenced a second mtDNA locus and four nuclear DNA (nDNA) loci for a subset of...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorPepper, Mitzy
dc.contributor.authorSumner, Joanna
dc.contributor.authorBrennan, Ian
dc.contributor.authorHodges, Kathryn
dc.contributor.authorLemmon, Alan R.
dc.contributor.authorLemmon, Emily Moriarty
dc.contributor.authorPeterson, Garry
dc.contributor.authorRabosky, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorSchwarzkopf, Lin
dc.contributor.authorScott, Ian
dc.contributor.authorShea, Glenn
dc.contributor.authorKeogh, J. Scott
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-05T23:56:11Z
dc.identifier.issn0305-0270
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/254520
dc.description.abstractAim: To develop a robust phylogeny for the iconic Australian water skinks (Eulamprus) and to explore the influence of landscape evolution of eastern Australia on phylogeographic patterns. Location: Eastern and south-eastern Australia. Methods: We used Sanger methods to sequence a mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) locus for 386 individuals across the five Eulamprus species to elucidate phylogeographic structure. We also sequenced a second mtDNA locus and four nuclear DNA (nDNA) loci for a subset of individuals to help inform our sampling strategy for next-generation sequencing. Finally, we generated an anchored hybrid enrichment (AHE) approach to sequence 378 loci for 25 individuals representing the major lineages identified in our Sanger dataset. These data were used to resolve the phylogenetic relationships among the species using coalescent-based species tree inference in *BEAST and ASTRAL. Results: The relationships between Eulamprus species were resolved with a high level of confidence using our AHE dataset. In addition, our extensive mtDNA sampling revealed substantial phylogeographic structure in all species, with the exception of the geographically highly restricted E. leuraensis. Ratios of patristic distances (mtDNA/nDNA) indicate on average a 30-fold greater distance as estimated using the mtDNA locus ND4. Main conclusions: The major divergences between lineages strongly support previously identified biogeographic barriers in eastern Australia based on studies of other taxa. These breaks appear to correlate with regions where the Great Escarpment is absent or obscure, suggesting topographic lowlands and the accompanying dry woodlands are a major barrier to dispersal for water skinks. While some river corridors, such as the Hunter Valley, were likely historically dry enough to inhibit the movement of Eulamprus populations, our data indicate that others, such as the Murray and Darling Rivers, are able to facilitate extensive gene flow through the vast arid and semi-arid lowlands of New South Wales and South Australia. Comparing the patristic distances between the mitochondrial and AHE datasets highlights the continued value in analysing both types of data.
dc.description.sponsorshipAustralian Research Council
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.rights© 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
dc.sourceJournal of Biogeography
dc.subjectanchored hybrid enrichment
dc.subjectEastern Australia
dc.subjectgene flow
dc.subjectgreat dividing range
dc.subjectMurray–Darling Basin
dc.subjectNewer Volcanics Province
dc.titleSpeciation in the mountains and dispersal by rivers: Molecular phylogeny of Eulamprus water skinks and the biogeography of Eastern Australia
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume45
dc.date.issued2018
local.identifier.absfor060309 - Phylogeny and Comparative Analysis
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4485658xPUB108
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.wiley.com/en-gb
local.type.statusAccepted Version
local.contributor.affiliationPepper, Mitzy, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationSumner, Joanna, Museum Victoria
local.contributor.affiliationBrennan, Ian, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationHodges, Kathryn, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationLemmon, Alan R., Florida State University
local.contributor.affiliationLemmon, Emily Moriarty, Florida State University
local.contributor.affiliationPeterson, Garry, Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning
local.contributor.affiliationRabosky, Daniel, University of Michigan
local.contributor.affiliationSchwarzkopf, Lin, James Cook University
local.contributor.affiliationScott, Ian, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationShea, Glenn, Australian Museum
local.contributor.affiliationKeogh, J Scott, College of Science, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue9
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage2040
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage2052
local.identifier.doi10.1111/jbi.13385
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2020-11-23T11:54:54Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85050464703
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancehttps://v2.sherpa.ac.uk/id/publication/7038..."The Accepted Version can be archived in a Non-Commercial Institutional Repository. 12 months embargo" from SHERPA/RoMEO site (as at 18/11/2022). This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [Pepper, Mitzy, et al. "Speciation in the mountains and dispersal by rivers: Molecular phylogeny of Eulamprus water skinks and the biogeography of Eastern Australia." Journal of Biogeography 45.9 (2018): 2040-2052.], which has been published in final form at [https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jbi.13385]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. This article may not be enhanced, enriched or otherwise transformed into a derivative work, without express permission from Wiley or by statutory rights under applicable legislation. Copyright notices must not be removed, obscured or modified. The article must be linked to Wiley’s version of record on Wiley Online Library and any embedding, framing or otherwise making available the article or pages thereof by third parties from platforms, services and websites other than Wiley Online Library must be prohibited.
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