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Non-declining amphibians can be important reservoir hosts for amphibian chytrid fungus

Brannelly, Laura A.; Webb, Rebecca; Hunter, D.A.; Clemann, Nick; Howard, K; Skerratt, Lee F.; Berger, Lee; Scheele, Benjamin

Description

Amphibian chytridiomycosis, caused by infection with Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), is the most devastating vertebrate disease on record. Reservoir hosts are likely to be important in the Bd‐amphibian system because many amphibian species can carry infections without experiencing mortality. However, while a variety of reservoirs have been proposed, few have been empirically demonstrated to act as competent reservoir hosts. In this study, we investigate whether the common eastern froglet,...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBrannelly, Laura A.
dc.contributor.authorWebb, Rebecca
dc.contributor.authorHunter, D.A.
dc.contributor.authorClemann, Nick
dc.contributor.authorHoward, K
dc.contributor.authorSkerratt, Lee F.
dc.contributor.authorBerger, Lee
dc.contributor.authorScheele, Benjamin
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-18T00:15:41Z
dc.identifier.issn1367-9430
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/251888
dc.description.abstractAmphibian chytridiomycosis, caused by infection with Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), is the most devastating vertebrate disease on record. Reservoir hosts are likely to be important in the Bd‐amphibian system because many amphibian species can carry infections without experiencing mortality. However, while a variety of reservoirs have been proposed, few have been empirically demonstrated to act as competent reservoir hosts. In this study, we investigate whether the common eastern froglet, Crinia signifera, a non‐declining species that is widespread in eastern Australia, is a reservoir host for Bd infection. We conducted a long‐term, large‐scale field survey to investigate disease dynamics in C. signifera at sites where four sympatric, threatened anuran species have severely declined. We also monitored Bd‐infected C. signifera in the laboratory to determine susceptibility and survivorship. Finally, we assessed population age structure to investigate disease impact in the wild. We found that C. signifera is a competent reservoir host, maintaining high prevalence and infection intensities in the wild and in the laboratory, with no signs of sub‐lethal effects or clinical disease. In the wild, the modal age is 4 years with individuals living up to 6 years, indicating that adults can survive across multiple years despite high infection prevalence and intensity. The occurrence of C. signifera at sites with remnant populations of threatened species likely contributes to ongoing disease impact in declining species decades after the arrival of Bd. The presence of C. signifera at sites where threatened species have become extinct inhibits effective reintroductions, and we recommend avoiding sites with high reservoir host abundance when planning reintroductions.
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding was provided by the Australian Research Council (grants FT100100375, LP110200240, DP120100811), New South Wales Office of Environment and Heritage, New South Wales Department of Environment and Climate Change, the Victoria Department of Sustainability and Environment, Victoria Department of Environment and Primary Industries Parks Victoria, and the Taronga Conservation Science Initiative.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherWiley
dc.rights© 2017 The Zoological Society of London
dc.sourceAnimal Conservation
dc.subjectAustralia
dc.subjectchytridiomycosis
dc.subjectemerging infectious disease
dc.subjectreservoir host
dc.subjectwildlife disease
dc.subjectamphibians
dc.subjectBatrachochytrium dendrobatidis
dc.titleNon-declining amphibians can be important reservoir hosts for amphibian chytrid fungus
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume21
dc.date.issued2018
local.identifier.absfor110309 - Infectious Diseases
local.identifier.absfor050202 - Conservation and Biodiversity
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB8810
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.wiley.com/en-gb
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationBrannelly, Laura A., James Cook University
local.contributor.affiliationWebb, Rebecca, James Cook University
local.contributor.affiliationHunter, D.A., NSW Office of Environment and Heritage
local.contributor.affiliationClemann, Nick, Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning
local.contributor.affiliationHoward, K, Department of Environment, Land Water and Planning
local.contributor.affiliationSkerratt, Lee F., James Cook University
local.contributor.affiliationBerger, Lee, James Cook University
local.contributor.affiliationScheele, Ben, College of Science, ANU
local.description.embargo2099-12-31
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FT100100375
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/LP110200240
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP120100811
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage91
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage101
local.identifier.doi10.1111/acv.12380
dc.date.updated2020-11-23T11:49:44Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85033662061
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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