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The paradox of human milk doping for anti-doping

Forgues, Chantalle; Mazanov, Jason; Smith, Julie

Description

Human milk is employed as a reference substance to assess the equivocal language defining the three tests (enhancement, health and violation of the Spirit of Sport) for prohibiting substances and methods under the World Anti-Doping Code (the Code). Human milk is demonstrated to be consumed by athletes with intent to enhance performance, presents a non-trivial risk to health, and violates the Spirit of Sport.The implications of prohibiting human milk under the Code demonstrate the increasing...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorForgues, Chantalle
dc.contributor.authorMazanov, Jason
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Julie
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-30T05:50:05Z
dc.identifier.issn2211-2669
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/249091
dc.description.abstractHuman milk is employed as a reference substance to assess the equivocal language defining the three tests (enhancement, health and violation of the Spirit of Sport) for prohibiting substances and methods under the World Anti-Doping Code (the Code). Human milk is demonstrated to be consumed by athletes with intent to enhance performance, presents a non-trivial risk to health, and violates the Spirit of Sport.The implications of prohibiting human milk under the Code demonstrate the increasing complexity and unintended (sometimes absurd) outcomes that arise from the implementation of the anti-doping ideology. The discussion focuses on two outcomes of the analysis. Firstly, the trade-off between administrative convenience and a workable drug control system for sport is considered (e.g. transparency versus decision latitude). Secondly, the discussion raises questions about the extent to which anti-doping policy makers consider third party harms with trading athletes and sporting interests relative to others individuals (e.g.babies) and society more broadly. The plausible prohibition of human milk under the Code indicates that a much closer examination of how best to manage performance enhancing technology in sport is needed, especially with regards to the influence of anti-doping beyond sport.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.rights© 2017 Elsevier Ltd.
dc.sourcePerformance Enhancement and Health
dc.subjectAnti-doping
dc.subjectHuman milk
dc.subjectThird party harms
dc.subjectDrug policy
dc.titleThe paradox of human milk doping for anti-doping
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume5
dc.date.issued2017
local.identifier.absfor111799 - Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationu1026210xPUB137
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.elsevier.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationForgues, Chantalle, Plymouth State University
local.contributor.affiliationMazanov, Jason, UNSW
local.contributor.affiliationSmith, Julie, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.description.embargo2099-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue4
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage158
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage165
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.peh.2017.08.002
local.identifier.absseo920499 - Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
dc.date.updated2020-11-23T11:19:11Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85029766371
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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