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The influence of leaf size and shape on leaf thermal dynamics: Does theory hold up under natural conditions?

Leigh, Andrea; Sevanto, S.; Close, John; Nicotra, Adrienne

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Laboratory studies on artificial leaves suggest that leaf thermal dynamics are strongly influenced by the two-dimensional size and shape of leaves and associated boundary layer thickness. Hot environments are therefore said to favour selection for small, narrow or dissected leaves. Empirical evidence from real leaves under field conditions is scant and traditionally based on point measurements that do not capture spatial variation in heat load. We used thermal imagery under field conditions to...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorLeigh, Andrea
dc.contributor.authorSevanto, S.
dc.contributor.authorClose, John
dc.contributor.authorNicotra, Adrienne
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-09T00:45:49Z
dc.date.available2021-09-09T00:45:49Z
dc.identifier.issn0140-7791
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/247720
dc.description.abstractLaboratory studies on artificial leaves suggest that leaf thermal dynamics are strongly influenced by the two-dimensional size and shape of leaves and associated boundary layer thickness. Hot environments are therefore said to favour selection for small, narrow or dissected leaves. Empirical evidence from real leaves under field conditions is scant and traditionally based on point measurements that do not capture spatial variation in heat load. We used thermal imagery under field conditions to measure the leaf thermal time constant (τ) in summer and the leaf-to-air temperature difference (∆T) and temperature range across laminae (Trange) during winter, autumn and summer for 68 Proteaceae species. We investigated the influence of leaf area and margin complexity relative to effective leaf width (we), the latter being a more direct indicator of boundary layer thickness. Normalized difference of margin complexity had no or weak effects on thermal dynamics, but we strongly predicted τ and ∆T, whereas leaf area influenced Trange. Unlike artificial leaves, however, spatial temperature distribution in large leaves appeared to be governed largely by structural variation. Therefore, we agree that small size, specifically we, has adaptive value in hot environments but not with the idea that thermal regulation is the primary evolutionary driver of leaf dissection.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by an Australian Geographic research grant and an Australian Postgraduate Award to A. Leigh; and by an Australian Research Council grant A00103546 to A.B. Nicotra.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.rights© 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
dc.sourcePlant Cell and Environment
dc.subjectboundary layer
dc.subjectcooling time constant
dc.subjecteffective leaf width
dc.subjectinfrared imagery
dc.subjectleaf dissection
dc.subjectleaf shape
dc.subjectleaf size
dc.subjectleaf temperature
dc.subjectthermal dynamics
dc.titleThe influence of leaf size and shape on leaf thermal dynamics: Does theory hold up under natural conditions?
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume40
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-10-27
dc.date.issued2017-01-10
local.identifier.absfor060203 - Ecological Physiology
local.identifier.absfor060705 - Plant Physiology
local.identifier.absfor020699 - Quantum Physics not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4485658xPUB54
local.publisher.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/
local.type.statusAccepted Version
local.contributor.affiliationLeigh, Andrea, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationSevanto, S., Los Alamos National Laboratory
local.contributor.affiliationClose, John, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationNicotra, Adrienne, College of Science, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage237
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage248
local.identifier.doi10.1111/pce.12857
dc.date.updated2020-11-23T11:17:39Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85007452599
local.identifier.thomsonID000393788500007
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancehttps://v2.sherpa.ac.uk/id/publication/35502..."Author accepted manuscript can be made open access on institutional repository after 12 month embargo" from SHERPA/RoMEO site (as at 9.9.2021).
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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