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Plio-Pleistocene foundations of hominin musicality: coevolution of cognition, sociality, and music

Killin, Anton

Description

Today, music is ubiquitous, highly valued in all known cultures, playing many roles in human daily life. The ethnographic study of the music of extant human foragers makes this quite apparent. Moreover, music is ancient. Sophisticated bird-bone and ivory flutes dated from 40 kya reveal an even earlier musical-technological tradition. So is music likely to be an entrenched feature of human social life during the long passage to behavioral modernity—say, by 150 kya—or earlier? In this article I...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorKillin, Anton
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-01T04:24:43Z
dc.identifier.issn1555-5542
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/247302
dc.description.abstractToday, music is ubiquitous, highly valued in all known cultures, playing many roles in human daily life. The ethnographic study of the music of extant human foragers makes this quite apparent. Moreover, music is ancient. Sophisticated bird-bone and ivory flutes dated from 40 kya reveal an even earlier musical-technological tradition. So is music likely to be an entrenched feature of human social life during the long passage to behavioral modernity—say, by 150 kya—or earlier? In this article I sketch an evolutionary model that focuses on hominin vocal musicality and communication in the Pleistocene, tracking between series of phenotypes and changes in ecological, social, cognitive, and informational contexts. The model links musicality and protomusic to a bigger picture of hominin socio-cognitive evolution, making some connections clearer, motivating further theorizing and the search for new evidence.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherMIT Press
dc.rights© Konrad Lorenz Institute for Evolution and Cognition Research 2017
dc.sourceBiological Theory
dc.subjectEvolution of music
dc.subjectHominin evolution
dc.subjectMusicality
dc.subjectProtomusic
dc.subjectSocio-cognitive niche construction
dc.titlePlio-Pleistocene foundations of hominin musicality: coevolution of cognition, sociality, and music
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume12
dc.date.issued2017
local.identifier.absfor220319 - Social Philosophy
local.identifier.ariespublicationu8205243xPUB963
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.springerlink.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationKillin, Anton, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2099-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue4
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage222
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage235
local.identifier.doi10.1007/s13752-017-0274-6
local.identifier.absseo970122 - Expanding Knowledge in Philosophy and Religious Studies
dc.date.updated2020-11-23T10:57:04Z
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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