Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Perinatal and social factors predicting caesarean birth in a 2004 Australian birth cohort

Robson, Stephen; Vally, Hassan; Mohamed, Abdel-Latif; Yu, Maggie; Westrupp, Elizabeth M

Description

Background: The proportion of babies born by caesarean section in Australia has almost doubled over the last 25 years. Factors known to contribute to caesarean such as higher maternal age, mothers being overweight or obese, or having had a previous caesarean do not completely account for the increased rate and it is clear that other influences exist. Aim: To identify previously unsuspected risk factors associated with caesarean using nationally-representative data from the Longitudinal Study of...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorRobson, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorVally, Hassan
dc.contributor.authorMohamed, Abdel-Latif
dc.contributor.authorYu, Maggie
dc.contributor.authorWestrupp, Elizabeth M
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-29T23:46:09Z
dc.identifier.issn1871-5192
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/245907
dc.description.abstractBackground: The proportion of babies born by caesarean section in Australia has almost doubled over the last 25 years. Factors known to contribute to caesarean such as higher maternal age, mothers being overweight or obese, or having had a previous caesarean do not completely account for the increased rate and it is clear that other influences exist. Aim: To identify previously unsuspected risk factors associated with caesarean using nationally-representative data from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children. Methods: Data were from the birth cohort, a long-term prospective study of approximately 5000 children that includes richly-detailed data regarding maternal health and exposures during pregnancy. Logistic regression was used to examine the contribution of a wide range of pregnancy, birth and social factors to caesarean. Findings: 28% of 4862 mothers were delivered by caesarean. The final adjusted analyses revealed that use of diabetes medication (OR = 3.1, 95% CI = 1.7–5.5, p < 0.001) and maternal mental health problems during pregnancy (OR = 1.3, CI = 1.1–1.6, p = 0.003) were associated with increased odds of caesarean. Young maternal age (OR = 0.6, CI = 0.5–0.7, p < 0.001), having two or more children (OR = 0.7, CI = 0.6–0.9, p < 0.001), and fathers having an unskilled occupation (OR = 0.7, CI = 0.6–1.0, p = 0.036) were associated with reduced odds of caesarean. Conclusion: Our findings raise the prospect that the effect of additional screening and support for maternal mental health on caesarean rate should be subject of prospective study.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.rights© 2017 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of Australian College of Midwives
dc.sourceWomen and Birth
dc.subjectCaesarean section
dc.subjectLongitudinal study
dc.subjectRisk factors
dc.subjectPopulation
dc.subjectPerinatal
dc.titlePerinatal and social factors predicting caesarean birth in a 2004 Australian birth cohort
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume30
dc.date.issued2017
local.identifier.absfor111402 - Obstetrics and Gynaecology
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB7415
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.elsevier.com/en-au
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationRobson, Stephen, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationVally, Hassan, La Trobe University
local.contributor.affiliationMohamed, Abdel-Latif, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationYu, Maggie, The Australian Institute of Family Studies
local.contributor.affiliationWestrupp, Elizabeth M, La Trobe University
local.description.embargo2099-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue6
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage506
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage510
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.wombi.2017.05.002
local.identifier.absseo970111 - Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
local.identifier.absseo920205 - Health Education and Promotion
dc.date.updated2020-11-23T10:55:48Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85021795871
local.identifier.thomsonIDMEDLINE:28688791
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Robson_Perinatal_and_social_factors_2017.pdf269.86 kBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator