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Non-target impacts of weed control on birds, mammals, and reptiles

Lindenmayer, David B; Wood, Jeffrey; MacGregor, Chris; Hobbs, Richard; Catford, Jane

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The impacts of invasive plant control on native animals are rarely evaluated. Using data from an eight-year study in southeastern Australia, we quantified the effects on native bird, mammal, and reptile species of (1) the abundance of the invasive Bitou Bush, Chrysanthemoides monilifera ssp. rotundata, and (2) a Bitou Bush control program, which involved repeated herbicide spraying interspersed with prescribed burning. We found that overall species richness of birds, mammals, and reptiles and...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorLindenmayer, David B
dc.contributor.authorWood, Jeffrey
dc.contributor.authorMacGregor, Chris
dc.contributor.authorHobbs, Richard
dc.contributor.authorCatford, Jane
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-20T01:18:10Z
dc.date.available2021-08-20T01:18:10Z
dc.identifier.issn2150-8925
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/244051
dc.description.abstractThe impacts of invasive plant control on native animals are rarely evaluated. Using data from an eight-year study in southeastern Australia, we quantified the effects on native bird, mammal, and reptile species of (1) the abundance of the invasive Bitou Bush, Chrysanthemoides monilifera ssp. rotundata, and (2) a Bitou Bush control program, which involved repeated herbicide spraying interspersed with prescribed burning. We found that overall species richness of birds, mammals, and reptiles and the majority of individual vertebrate species were unresponsive to Bitou Bush cover and the number of plants. Two species including the nationally endangered Eastern Bristlebird (Dasyurus brachypterus) responded positively to measures of native vegetation cover following the control of Bitou Bush. Analyses of the effects of different components of the treatment protocol employed to control Bitou Bush revealed (1) no negative effects of spraying on vertebrate species richness; (2) negative effects of spraying on only one individual species (Scarlet Honeyeater); and (3) lower bird species richness but higher reptile species richness after fire. The occupancy of most individual vertebrates species was unaffected by burning; four species responded negatively and one positively to fire. Our study indicated that actions to remove Bitou Bush generally have few negative impacts on native vertebrates. We therefore suggest that controlling this highly invasive exotic plant species has only very limited negative impacts on vertebrate biota.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis project was supported by grants by the Australian Research Council, the Department of the Environment and Energy, and the Department of Defence.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherEcological Society of America
dc.rights© 2017 Lindenmayer et al.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceEcosphere
dc.subjectanimal response to weed control
dc.subjectBitou Bush
dc.subjectfire management
dc.subjectherbicide impact on animals
dc.subjectindirect impacts
dc.subjectinvasive alien plant management
dc.subjectnon-target impacts
dc.subjectoff-target impacts
dc.subjectsecondary effects
dc.subjectweed control
dc.subjectweed management impacts
dc.titleNon-target impacts of weed control on birds, mammals, and reptiles
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume8
dc.date.issued2017
local.identifier.absfor050205 - Environmental Management
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB6540
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.esa.org/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationLindenmayer, David, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationWood, Jeffrey, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationMacGregor, Chris, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationHobbs, Richard, University of Western Australia
local.contributor.affiliationCatford, Jane, College of Science, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue5
local.bibliographicCitation.startpagee01804
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpagee01804
local.identifier.doi10.1002/ecs2.1804
local.identifier.absseo960800 - FLORA, FAUNA AND BIODIVERSITY
dc.date.updated2020-11-23T10:53:16Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85019905323
local.identifier.thomsonID000402472300014
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenanceThis is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons License (Attribution 4.0 International)
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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