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Montane Collembola at risk from climate change in Australia

Greenslade, Penelope; Slatyer, Rachel

Description

Collembola are an important component of montane arthropod communities worldwide, where they are often the most abundant and active group. In Australia, montane ecosystems are predicted to contract with continued climate warming, yet little is known about the faunal composition of Collembola on mountains nor its level of endemism. We compared the composition of Collembola communities from five mountain summits along a latitudinal gradient in eastern Australia. Each mountain harboured a distinct...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorGreenslade, Penelope
dc.contributor.authorSlatyer, Rachel
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-16T01:08:33Z
dc.identifier.issn1164-5563
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/243892
dc.description.abstractCollembola are an important component of montane arthropod communities worldwide, where they are often the most abundant and active group. In Australia, montane ecosystems are predicted to contract with continued climate warming, yet little is known about the faunal composition of Collembola on mountains nor its level of endemism. We compared the composition of Collembola communities from five mountain summits along a latitudinal gradient in eastern Australia. Each mountain harboured a distinct Collembola community, with few shared species/morphospecies. Even at the genus and family level, however, mountains varied considerably in faunal composition. Although no latitudinal trends were detected, short range endemism of morphospecies was high. Year-to-year variation in community composition within sites was small compared to between-site variation, even when collections were made 10 years apart. These results suggest that montane Collembola taxa may be resilient, as far as short term variations in weather are concerned. However, there is no evidence as to whether longer-lasting warmer conditions would be tolerated. If not, large scale losses of locally endemic species but not genera, unless they are monobasic, are likely.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.rights© 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS.
dc.sourceEuropean Journal of Soil Biology
dc.subjectLatitudinal gradient
dc.subjectMountain biogeography
dc.subjectShort-range endemics
dc.subjectSpecies richness
dc.titleMontane Collembola at risk from climate change in Australia
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume80
dc.date.issued2017
local.identifier.absfor060306 - Evolutionary Impacts of Climate Change
local.identifier.absfor060399 - Evolutionary Biology not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB6481
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.elsevier.com/en-au
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationGreenslade, Penelope, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationSlatyer, Rachel, College of Science, ANU
local.description.embargo2099-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage85
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage91
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ejsobi.2017.05.002
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2020-11-23T10:50:36Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85019457286
local.identifier.thomsonID000404704700012
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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