Skip navigation
Skip navigation

A biomarker and isotope study of Paleoproterozoic ecosystems in the northern Australian McArthur Basin

Vinnichenko, Galina

Description

Biomarkers represent an important source of information about ancient environments, especially in the Paleoproterozoic, where the body fossil record is comparatively scarce. The northern Australian McArthur Basin contains currently the oldest known indigenous biomarkers in the 1.64 Ga Barney Creek Formation (Fm). Based on published biomarker data, the oceans were almost exclusively inhabited by prokaryotic microorganisms, while eukaryotes with complex cell structure still played an...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorVinnichenko, Galina
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-09T09:13:01Z
dc.date.available2021-08-09T09:13:01Z
dc.identifier.otherb73316040
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/243297
dc.description.abstractBiomarkers represent an important source of information about ancient environments, especially in the Paleoproterozoic, where the body fossil record is comparatively scarce. The northern Australian McArthur Basin contains currently the oldest known indigenous biomarkers in the 1.64 Ga Barney Creek Formation (Fm). Based on published biomarker data, the oceans were almost exclusively inhabited by prokaryotic microorganisms, while eukaryotes with complex cell structure still played an insignificant role. However, newly recognized protosteroids in the Barney Creek Fm may record early stages in eukaryotic evolution. This thesis, which consists of four linked research topics, investigates biological community signatures and paleo-environments in a transect through the Barney Creek Fm succession and circumjacent units; explores preservation of organic matter associated with the Paleoproterozoic McArthur River zinc-lead ore deposit; and describes the influence of thermal maturity on compound-specific carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition of lipids in the Barney Creek Fm. Additionally, this research presents the discovery of trimethyl aryl isoprenoids from carbonaceous shales of the 1.73 Ga Wollogorang Fm in the McArthur Basin, revealing the activity of phototrophic bacteria and extending the biomarker record back in time by ~90 million years.
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.titleA biomarker and isotope study of Paleoproterozoic ecosystems in the northern Australian McArthur Basin
dc.typeThesis (PhD)
local.contributor.supervisorBrocks, Jochen
local.contributor.supervisorcontactu4240521@anu.edu.au
dc.date.issued2021
local.contributor.affiliationResearch School of Earth Science, ANU College of Science, The Australian National University
local.identifier.doi10.25911/WGWA-7556
dc.provenanceMade OA 17.11.2022 after no response from author re: extending restriction
local.identifier.proquestNo
local.identifier.researcherID263890130
local.thesisANUonly.author60190c83-d018-4e1d-8571-8256f0589f6e
local.thesisANUonly.title000000015908_TC_1
local.thesisANUonly.keye0951fe6-c8fc-6c2b-d678-907a5a58eac7
local.mintdoimint
CollectionsOpen Access Theses

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
Thesis_Vinnichenko 2021.pdfThesis Material10.42 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  17 November 2022/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator