Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Midsagittal corpus callosum area and conversion to multiple sclerosis after clinically isolated syndrome: A multicentre Australian cohort study

Odenthal, Cara; Simpson, Steve; Oughton, Justin; Van Der Mei, Ingrid; Rose, Stephen; Fripp, Jurgen; Lucas, Robyn; Taylor, Bruce; Dear, Keith; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Coulthard, Alan

Description

INTRODUCTION: Patients presenting with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) may proceed to clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS). Midsagittal corpus callosum area (CCA) is a surrogate marker for callosal atrophy, and can be obtained from a standard MRI study. This study explores the relationship between CCA measured at CIS presentation (baseline) and at 5 years post presentation, with conversion from CIS to CDMS. The association between CCA and markers of disability progression is...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorOdenthal, Cara
dc.contributor.authorSimpson, Steve
dc.contributor.authorOughton, Justin
dc.contributor.authorVan Der Mei, Ingrid
dc.contributor.authorRose, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorFripp, Jurgen
dc.contributor.authorLucas, Robyn
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Bruce
dc.contributor.authorDear, Keith
dc.contributor.authorPonsonby, Anne-Louise
dc.contributor.authorCoulthard, Alan
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-09T05:09:53Z
dc.identifier.issn1754-9477
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/243287
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: Patients presenting with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) may proceed to clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS). Midsagittal corpus callosum area (CCA) is a surrogate marker for callosal atrophy, and can be obtained from a standard MRI study. This study explores the relationship between CCA measured at CIS presentation (baseline) and at 5 years post presentation, with conversion from CIS to CDMS. The association between CCA and markers of disability progression is explored. METHODS: Corpus callosum area was measured on MRI scans at presentation and 5-year review following diagnosis of a first demyelinating event, or evidence of progressive MS, in 143 participants in the Ausimmune/AusLong Study. Relationships between CCA (at baseline and follow-up) and clinical outcomes were assessed. RESULTS: Mean CCA at baseline study was 6.63 cm2 (SD 1.01). Patients who converted to MS by 5-year review (n = 100) had a significantly smaller mean CCA at follow-up (6.22 vs. 6.74, P = 0.007). Greater CCA reduction was associated with higher annualized relapse rate over follow-up. CONCLUSION: Baseline CCA obtained from standard MRI protocols may be compared with subsequent MRI examinations as a surrogate for neurodegeneration and cerebral atrophy in patients with MS. This study demonstrates an association between CCA and disability in individuals presenting with CIS who convert to MS.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research received funding through grants for the Ausimmune and AusLong studies (NHMRC ID GNT 1047180). Professor RM Lucas is supported by a NHMRC Research Fellowship.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherWiley
dc.rights© 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists
dc.sourceJournal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology
dc.subjectatrophy
dc.subjectclinically isolated syndrome
dc.subjectcorpus callosum
dc.subjectmagnetic resonance imaging
dc.subjectmultiple sclerosis
dc.titleMidsagittal corpus callosum area and conversion to multiple sclerosis after clinically isolated syndrome: A multicentre Australian cohort study
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume61
dc.date.issued2017
local.identifier.absfor111706 - Epidemiology
local.identifier.absfor110903 - Central Nervous System
local.identifier.absfor111711 - Health Information Systems (incl. Surveillance)
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4485658xPUB38
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.wiley.com/en-gb
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationOdenthal, Cara , Department of Medical Imaging Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital
local.contributor.affiliationSimpson, Steve, University of Tasmania
local.contributor.affiliationOughton, Justin, Department of Medical Imaging Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital
local.contributor.affiliationVan Der Mei, Ingrid, University of Tasmania Menzies Research Institute
local.contributor.affiliationRose , Stephen , School of Medicine The University of Queensland Brisbane
local.contributor.affiliationFripp , Jurgen , ICT- Australian e-Health Research Centre Brisbane QLD
local.contributor.affiliationLucas, Robyn, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationTaylor, Bruce, University of Tasmania
local.contributor.affiliationDear , Keith , Duke Kunshan University
local.contributor.affiliationPonsonby, Anne-Louise, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute & University of Melbourne
local.contributor.affiliationCoulthard, Alan, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital
local.description.embargo2099-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue4
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage453
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage460
local.identifier.doi10.1111/1754-9485.12570
local.identifier.absseo920404 - Disease Distribution and Transmission (incl. Surveillance and Response)
local.identifier.absseo920204 - Evaluation of Health Outcomes
local.identifier.absseo920111 - Nervous System and Disorders
dc.date.updated2020-11-23T10:49:26Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85007158148
local.identifier.thomsonID000407246300004
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Odenthal_Midsagittal_corpus_callosum_2017.pdf291.18 kBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator