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Malnutrition and non-communicable diseases among Bangladeshi women: an urban-rural comparison

Zahangir, MS; Hasan, MM; Richardson, Alice; Tabassum, S

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BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: This study aims at examining the urban-rural differentials in the effects of socioeconomic predictors on underweight and obesity of ever-married women in Bangladesh. The effect of malnutrition and other risk factors on non-communicable diseases is also examined. SUBJECTS/METHODS: The information regarding nutritional status, socioeconomic and demographic background, and non-communicable diseases of ever-married women was extracted from the nationally representative,...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorZahangir, MS
dc.contributor.authorHasan, MM
dc.contributor.authorRichardson, Alice
dc.contributor.authorTabassum, S
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-04T01:35:04Z
dc.date.available2021-08-04T01:35:04Z
dc.identifier.issn2044-4052
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/242795
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: This study aims at examining the urban-rural differentials in the effects of socioeconomic predictors on underweight and obesity of ever-married women in Bangladesh. The effect of malnutrition and other risk factors on non-communicable diseases is also examined. SUBJECTS/METHODS: The information regarding nutritional status, socioeconomic and demographic background, and non-communicable diseases of ever-married women was extracted from the nationally representative, cross-sectional Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey (BDHS 2011) data set. Both bivariate (χ2 test) and multivariate (multinomial logistic regression model) analyses were performed in determining the risk factors of malnutrition. The effect of malnutrition and associated risk factors on non-communicable diseases was determined using binary logistic regression models. RESULTS: The overall prevalence as well as the effects of individual risk factors of malnutrition differ in urban and rural settings. Regional differentials in the prevalence of underweight were statistically significant only for rural areas. In rural and urban settings, women from households with poor economic status were 67% (odds ratio (OR) 0.33, 95% CI 0.26-0.43) and 81% (OR=0.19, 95% CI 0.13-0.29) less likely to be overweight, respectively, with respect to those from affluent households. Women from the Rangpur division were significantly more likely to suffer from anemia (OR=1.41, 95% CI 1.13-1.77) and hypertension (OR=1.67, 95% CI 1.19-2.34) than those from the Sylhet division (reference division). With respect to those considered as underweight, women who were categorized as overweight were 0.47 (OR=0.53, 95% CI 0.43-0.65) times less likely to suffer from anemia, and 1.83 (OR=2.83, 95% CI 1.99-4.02) and 1.70 (OR=2.70, 95% CI 2.09-3.50) times more likely to suffer from diabetes and hypertension, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Rural-urban differentials in the effects of individual risk factors of malnutrition were observed. Wealth status of households and nutritional status of women showed significant effect on the prevalence of anemia, diabetes and hypertension.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2017
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceNutrition and Diabetes
dc.titleMalnutrition and non-communicable diseases among Bangladeshi women: an urban-rural comparison
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume7
dc.date.issued2017
local.identifier.absfor111104 - Public Nutrition Intervention
local.identifier.absfor111706 - Epidemiology
local.identifier.absfor111711 - Health Information Systems (incl. Surveillance)
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4102339xPUB159
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.nature.com/nutd/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationZahangir, MS, Department of Statistics, University of Chittagong,
local.contributor.affiliationHasan, MM, Department of Mathematics & Statistics University of Canberra
local.contributor.affiliationRichardson, Alice, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationTabassum, S, Department of Statistics, University of Chittagong,
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage8
local.identifier.doi10.1038/nutd.2017.2
local.identifier.absseo920204 - Evaluation of Health Outcomes
local.identifier.absseo920411 - Nutrition
local.identifier.absseo920206 - Health Inequalities
dc.date.updated2020-11-23T10:47:08Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85019483955
local.identifier.thomsonID000397772500006
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenanceThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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