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Explaining ecosystem multifunction with evolutionary models

Cadotte, Marc W.; Livingstone, Stuart W.; Yasui, Simone-Louise E.; Dinnage, Russell; Li, , Jin-Tian; Marushia, Robin; Santangelo, James; Shu, Wensheng

Description

Ecosystem function is the outcome of species interactions, traits, and niche overlap – all of which are influenced by evolution. However, it is not well understood how the tempo and mode of niche evolution can influence ecosystem function. In evolutionary models where either species differences accumulate through random drift in a single trait or species differences accumulate through divergent selection among close relatives, we should expect that ecosystem function is strongly related to...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorCadotte, Marc W.
dc.contributor.authorLivingstone, Stuart W.
dc.contributor.authorYasui, Simone-Louise E.
dc.contributor.authorDinnage, Russell
dc.contributor.authorLi, , Jin-Tian
dc.contributor.authorMarushia, Robin
dc.contributor.authorSantangelo, James
dc.contributor.authorShu, Wensheng
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-17T23:50:21Z
dc.date.available2021-06-17T23:50:21Z
dc.identifier.issn0012-9658
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/237805
dc.description.abstractEcosystem function is the outcome of species interactions, traits, and niche overlap – all of which are influenced by evolution. However, it is not well understood how the tempo and mode of niche evolution can influence ecosystem function. In evolutionary models where either species differences accumulate through random drift in a single trait or species differences accumulate through divergent selection among close relatives, we should expect that ecosystem function is strongly related to diversity. However, when strong selection causes species to converge on specific niches or when novel traits that directly affect function evolve in some clades but not others, the relationship between diversity and ecosystem function might not be very strong. We test these ideas using a field experiment that established plant mixtures with differing phylogenetic diversities and we measured ten different community functions. We show that some functions were strongly predicted by species richness and mean pairwise phylogenetic distance (MPD, a measure of phylogenetic diversity), including biomass production and the reduction of herbivore and pathogen damage in polyculture, while other functions had weaker (litter production and structural complexity) or nonsignificant relationships (e.g., flower production and arthropod abundance) with MPD and richness. However, these divergent results can be explained by different models of niche evolution. These results show that diversity‐ecosystem function relationships are the product of evolution, but that the nature of how evolution influences ecosystem function is complex.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherEcological Society of America
dc.rights© 2017 by the Ecological Society of America
dc.sourceEcology
dc.source.urihttps://esajournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/ecy.2045
dc.subjectbiodiversity
dc.subjectcommunity ecology
dc.subjectecosystem function
dc.subjectevolutionary models
dc.subjectmultifunctionality
dc.subjectphylogenetic diversity
dc.subjectplant ecology
dc.titleExplaining ecosystem multifunction with evolutionary models
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume98
dc.date.issued2017
local.identifier.absfor050102 - Ecosystem Function
local.identifier.absfor060202 - Community Ecology
local.identifier.absfor060309 - Phylogeny and Comparative Analysis
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB8967
local.publisher.urlhttps://esajournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationCadotte, Marc W., University of Toronto-Scarborough
local.contributor.affiliationLivingstone, Stuart W., University of Toronto-Scarborough
local.contributor.affiliationYasui, Simone-Louise E., University of Toronto-Scarborough
local.contributor.affiliationDinnage, Russell, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationLi,, Jin-Tian , Sun Yat-sen University
local.contributor.affiliationMarushia, Robin, University of Toronto-Scarborough
local.contributor.affiliationSantangelo, James, University of Toronto
local.contributor.affiliationShu, Wensheng, Sun Yat-sen University
local.bibliographicCitation.issue12
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage3175
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage3187
local.identifier.doi10.1002/ecy.2045
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2020-11-23T10:31:25Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85036528865
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancehttps://v2.sherpa.ac.uk/id/publication/13292..."Author can archive the Publisher's version/PDF" from SHERPA/RoMEO site as at 18/06/2021
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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