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Targeting Nutrient Uptake Mechanisms in Plasmodium

Kirk, Kiaran; Saliba, Kevin

Description

The proliferation of the intraerythrocytic malaria parasite is dependent on the uptake from the blood plasma, and from the cytoplasm of the host cell, of a range of essential nutrients. These compounds are taken up into the parasitised cell via a combination of constitutively active endogenous host cell transporters and new parasite-induced permeability pathways. On entering the infected cell they are taken up by the intracellular parasite, across the parasitophorous vacuole and parasite plasma...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorKirk, Kiaran
dc.contributor.authorSaliba, Kevin
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-07T22:39:04Z
dc.identifier.issn1389-4501
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/23701
dc.description.abstractThe proliferation of the intraerythrocytic malaria parasite is dependent on the uptake from the blood plasma, and from the cytoplasm of the host cell, of a range of essential nutrients. These compounds are taken up into the parasitised cell via a combination of constitutively active endogenous host cell transporters and new parasite-induced permeability pathways. On entering the infected cell they are taken up by the intracellular parasite, across the parasitophorous vacuole and parasite plasma membranes, via a combination of channels and transporters, and/or via endocytosis. Once inside the parasite, nutrients are typically phosphorylated and thereby effectively trapped within the cell. The intraerythrocytic parasite has a range of subcellular membrane-bound organelles, each endowed with their own complement of transport proteins which mediate the uptake and efflux of metabolic substrates and byproducts. Proteins that mediate the uptake, intracellular trafficking and metabolism of essential nutrients in the Plasmodium-infected erythrocyte are potential antimalarial drug targets. Here we consider the nature of the pathways involved, focusing in particular on those that mediate the uptake of three important nutrients: glucose, the key energy-substrate for the parasite; pantothenate (vitamin B5), the precursor of the important enzyme cofactor, coenzyme A; and choline, the precursor of the phospholipid phosphatidylcholine.
dc.publisherBentham Science Publishers Ltd
dc.sourceCurrent Drug Targets
dc.subjectamidine; ammonium derivative; antimalarial agent; carrier protein; chloroquine; choline; choline derivative; cj 15801; coenzyme A; dexpanthenol; glucose; glucose transport inhibitor; ion channel; membrane protein; pantothenic acid; phosphatidylcholine; ph Antimalarial; Choline; Glucose; Malaria; Pantothenate
dc.titleTargeting Nutrient Uptake Mechanisms in Plasmodium
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume8
dc.date.issued2007
local.identifier.absfor060502 - Infectious Agents
local.identifier.absfor060110 - Receptors and Membrane Biology
local.identifier.absfor111501 - Basic Pharmacology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4325460xPUB28
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationKirk, Kiaran, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationSaliba, Kevin, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage75
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage88
local.identifier.doi10.2174/138945007779315560
dc.date.updated2015-12-07T10:44:56Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-33846032314
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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