Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Teaching Strategies for Developing Students’ Argumentation Skills About Socioscientific Issues in High School Genetics

Dawson, Vaille Maree; Venville, Grady

Description

An outcome of science education is that young people have the understandings and skills to participate in public debate and make informed decisions about science issues that influence their lives. Toulmin’s argumentation skills are emerging as an effective strategy to enhance the quality of evidence based decision making in science classrooms. In this case study, an Australian science teacher participated in a one-on-one professional learning session on argumentation before explicitly teaching...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorDawson, Vaille Maree
dc.contributor.authorVenville, Grady
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-20T02:14:56Z
dc.identifier.issn0157-244X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/233379
dc.description.abstractAn outcome of science education is that young people have the understandings and skills to participate in public debate and make informed decisions about science issues that influence their lives. Toulmin’s argumentation skills are emerging as an effective strategy to enhance the quality of evidence based decision making in science classrooms. In this case study, an Australian science teacher participated in a one-on-one professional learning session on argumentation before explicitly teaching argumentation skills to two year 10 classes studying genetics. Over two lessons, the teacher used whole class discussion and writing frames of two socioscientific issues to teach students about argumentation. An analysis of classroom observation field notes, audiotaped lesson transcripts, writing frames and student interviews indicate that four factors promoted student argumentation. The factors are: the role of the teacher in facilitating whole class discussion; the use of writing frames; the context of the socioscientific issue; and the role of the students. It is recommended that professional learning to promote student argumentation may need to be tailored to individual teachers and that extensive classroom based research is required to determine the impact of classroom factors on students’ argumentation.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag
dc.rights© Springer Science + Business Media B.V. 2008
dc.sourceResearch in Science Education
dc.source.urihttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11165-008-9104-y
dc.subjectArgumentation
dc.subjectGenetics education
dc.subjectSocioscientific issues
dc.titleTeaching Strategies for Developing Students’ Argumentation Skills About Socioscientific Issues in High School Genetics
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesThe author Grady Venville was affiliated with University of Western Australia when the article was published.
local.identifier.citationvolume40
dc.date.issued2008
local.publisher.urlhttps://link.springer.com
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationGrady Jane Venville, Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic), Australian National University
local.description.embargo2099-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage133
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage148
local.identifier.doi10.1007/s11165-008-9104-y
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
Dawson-Venville2010_Article_TeachingStrategiesForDevelopin.pdf197.59 kBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator