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Causes and mechanisms of adipocyte enlargement and adipose expansion

Haczeyni, Fahrettin; Bell-Anderson, Kim S.; Farrell, Geoffrey

Description

Adipose tissue plays a significant role in whole body energy homeostasis. Obesity-associated diabetes, fatty liver and metabolic syndrome are closely linked to adipose stress and dysfunction. Genetic predisposition, overeating and physical inactivity influence the expansion of adipose tissues. Under conditions of constant energy surplus, adipocytes become hypertrophic and adipose tissues undergo hyperplasia so as to increase their lipid storage capacity, thereby keeping circulating blood...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHaczeyni, Fahrettin
dc.contributor.authorBell-Anderson, Kim S.
dc.contributor.authorFarrell, Geoffrey
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-13T00:44:15Z
dc.identifier.issn1467-7881
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/232997
dc.description.abstractAdipose tissue plays a significant role in whole body energy homeostasis. Obesity-associated diabetes, fatty liver and metabolic syndrome are closely linked to adipose stress and dysfunction. Genetic predisposition, overeating and physical inactivity influence the expansion of adipose tissues. Under conditions of constant energy surplus, adipocytes become hypertrophic and adipose tissues undergo hyperplasia so as to increase their lipid storage capacity, thereby keeping circulating blood glucose and fatty acids below toxic levels. Nonetheless, adipocytes have a saturation point where they lose capacity to store more lipids. At this stage, when adipocytes are fully lipid-engorged, they express stress signals. Adipose depots (particularly visceral compartments) from obese individuals with a severe metabolic phenotype are characterized by the high proportion of hypertrophic adipocytes. This review focuses on the mechanisms of adipocyte enlargement in relation to adipose fatty acid and cholesterol metabolism, and considers how this may be related to adipose dysfunction.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) project grants: 1044288 and 102818.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.rights© 2017 World Obesity Federation
dc.sourceObesity Reviews
dc.subjectAdipose tissue
dc.subjectcellular hypertrophy
dc.subjecthyperplasia
dc.subjectinsulin resistance
dc.titleCauses and mechanisms of adipocyte enlargement and adipose expansion
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume19
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-10-23
dc.date.issued2017-12-15
local.identifier.absfor110107 - Metabolic Medicine
local.identifier.absfor170106 - Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB9328
local.publisher.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationHaczeyni, Fahrettin, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBell-Anderson, Kim S., University of Sydney
local.contributor.affiliationFarrell, Geoffrey, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.description.embargo2099-12-31
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1044288
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage406
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage420
local.identifier.doi10.1111/obr.12646
dc.date.updated2020-11-23T11:35:39Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85041103701
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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