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The value of scattered trees for wildlife: Contrasting effects of landscape context and tree size

Le Roux, Darren; Stagoll (Ikin), Karen; Lindenmayer, David; Manning, Adrian; Gibbons, Philip

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Aim: The biodiversity value of scattered trees in modified landscapes is often overlooked in planning and conservation decisions. We conducted a multitaxa study to determine how wildlife abundance, species richness and community composition at individual trees are affected by (1) the landscape context in which trees are located; and (2) the size of trees. Location: Canberra, south-eastern Australia. Methods: Trunk arthropod, bat and bird surveys were undertaken over 3 years (2012–2014) at 72...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorLe Roux, Darren
dc.contributor.authorStagoll (Ikin), Karen
dc.contributor.authorLindenmayer, David
dc.contributor.authorManning, Adrian
dc.contributor.authorGibbons, Philip
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-12T01:45:59Z
dc.date.available2021-05-12T01:45:59Z
dc.identifier.citationLe Roux DS, Ikin K, Lindenmayer DB, Manning AD, Gibbons P. The value of scattered trees for wildlife: Contrasting effects of landscape context and tree size. Divers Distrib. 2018;24:69–81. https://doi.org/10.1111/ddi.12658
dc.identifier.issn1366-9516
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/232676
dc.description.abstractAim: The biodiversity value of scattered trees in modified landscapes is often overlooked in planning and conservation decisions. We conducted a multitaxa study to determine how wildlife abundance, species richness and community composition at individual trees are affected by (1) the landscape context in which trees are located; and (2) the size of trees. Location: Canberra, south-eastern Australia. Methods: Trunk arthropod, bat and bird surveys were undertaken over 3 years (2012–2014) at 72 trees of three sizes (small (20–50 cm DBH), medium (51–80 cm), large (≥80 cm)) located in four landscape contexts (reserves, pasture, urban parklands, urban built-up areas). Results: Landscape context affected all taxa surveyed. Trunk arthropod communities differed between trees in urban built-up areas and reserves. Bat activity and richness were significantly reduced at trees in urban built-up areas suggesting that echolocating bats may be disturbed by high levels of urbanization. Bird abundance and richness were highest at trees located in modified landscapes, highlighting the value of scattered trees for birds. Bird communities also differed between non-urban and urban trees. Tree size had a significant effect on birds but did not affect trunk arthropods and bats. Large trees supported higher bird abundance, richness and more unique species compared to medium and small trees. Main conclusions: Scattered trees support a diversity of wildlife. However, landscape context and tree size affected wildlife in contrasting ways. Land management strategies are needed to collectively account for responses exhibited by multiple taxa at varying spatial scales. We recommend that the retention and perpetuation of scattered trees in modified landscapes should be prioritized, hereby providing crucial habitat benefits to a multitude of taxa.
dc.description.sponsorshipDSL was funded by an Australian Postgraduate Award (The Australian National University) and a top-up scholarship (Land Development Agency, ACT Government). Land Development Agency, ACT Government; Australian Research Council, Grant/Award Number: FT100100358; Fenner School of Environment and Society, Australian National University
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.rights© 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.sourceDiversity and Distributions
dc.subjectarthropods,
dc.subjectbats,
dc.subjectbirds,
dc.subjectconservation planning,
dc.subjecthuman-modified landscapes
dc.subjectlarge old trees
dc.titleThe value of scattered trees for wildlife: Contrasting effects of landscape context and tree size
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume24
dc.date.issued2017-10-09
local.identifier.absfor050202 - Conservation and Biodiversity
local.identifier.absfor060299 - Ecology not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB8846
local.publisher.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationLe Roux, Darren, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationStagoll (Ikin), Karen, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationLindenmayer, David, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationManning, Adrian, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationGibbons, Philip, College of Science, ANU
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FT100100358
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage69
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage81
local.identifier.doi10.1111/ddi.12658
dc.date.updated2020-11-23T11:59:18Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85037585472
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancehttps://v2.sherpa.ac.uk/id/publication/6798..."Published version can be made open access on institutional repsository with CC BY-NC-ND license" from SHERPA/ROMEO site (as at 12.5.2021)
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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