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Nutrient limitations to bacterial and fungal growth during cellulose decomposition in tropical forest soils

Nottingham, Andrew T.; Hicks, Lettice C.; Ccahuana, Adan J. Q.; Salinas, Norma; Baath, Erland; Meir, Patrick

Description

Nutrients constrain the soil carbon cycle in tropical forests, but we lack knowledge on how these constraints vary within the soil microbial community. Here, we used in situ fertilization in a montane tropical forest and in two lowland tropical forests on contrasting soil types to test the principal hypothesis that there are different nutrient constraints to different groups of microorganisms during the decomposition of cellulose. We also tested the hypotheses that decomposers shift from...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorNottingham, Andrew T.
dc.contributor.authorHicks, Lettice C.
dc.contributor.authorCcahuana, Adan J. Q.
dc.contributor.authorSalinas, Norma
dc.contributor.authorBaath, Erland
dc.contributor.authorMeir, Patrick
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-12T01:30:28Z
dc.date.available2021-05-12T01:30:28Z
dc.identifier.issn0178-2762
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/232671
dc.description.abstractNutrients constrain the soil carbon cycle in tropical forests, but we lack knowledge on how these constraints vary within the soil microbial community. Here, we used in situ fertilization in a montane tropical forest and in two lowland tropical forests on contrasting soil types to test the principal hypothesis that there are different nutrient constraints to different groups of microorganisms during the decomposition of cellulose. We also tested the hypotheses that decomposers shift from nitrogen to phosphorus constraints from montane to lowland forests, respectively, and are further constrained by potassium and sodium deficiency in the western Amazon. Cellulose and nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, and combined) were added to soils in situ, and microbial growth on cellulose (phospholipid fatty acids and ergosterol) and respiration were measured. Microbial growth on cellulose after single nutrient additions was highest following nitrogen addition for fungi, suggesting nitrogen as the primary limiting nutrient for cellulose decomposition. This was observed at all sites, with no clear shift in nutrient constraints to decomposition between lowland and montane sites. We also observed positive respiration and fungal growth responses to sodium and potassium addition at one of the lowland sites. However, when phosphorus was added, and especially when added in combination with other nutrients, bacterial growth was highest, suggesting that bacteria out-compete fungi for nitrogen where phosphorus is abundant. In summary, nitrogen constrains fungal growth and cellulose decomposition in both lowland and montane tropical forest soils, but additional nutrients may also be of critical importance in determining the balance between fungal and bacterial decomposition of cellulose.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study is a product of the Andes Biodiversity and Ecosystem Research Group consortium (www.andesconservation.org) and was financed by the UK Natural Environment Research Council NE/G018278/1 to PM, a European Union Marie-Curie Fellowship FP7-2012-329360 to ATN and ARC award DP170104091 to PM.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.rights© 2017 The Author(s)
dc.rights.urihttp:// creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceBiology and Fertility of Soils
dc.subjectDecomposition
dc.subjectEcological stoichiometry
dc.subjectPhospholipid fatty acids
dc.subjectTropical lowland forest
dc.subjectTropical montane forest
dc.subjectSoil carbon
dc.subjectSoil microorganisms
dc.titleNutrient limitations to bacterial and fungal growth during cellulose decomposition in tropical forest soils
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume54
dc.date.issued2018
local.identifier.absfor070502 - Forestry Biomass and Bioproducts
local.identifier.absfor050303 - Soil Biology
local.identifier.absfor060501 - Bacteriology
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB8800
local.publisher.urlhttps://link.springer.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationNottingham, Andrew T., University of Edinburgh
local.contributor.affiliationHicks, Lettice C., University of Edinburgh
local.contributor.affiliationCcahuana, Adan J. Q., Universidad Nacional de San Antonio Abad
local.contributor.affiliationSalinas, Norma, Pontificia Universidad
local.contributor.affiliationBaath, Erland, Lund University
local.contributor.affiliationMeir, Patrick, College of Science, ANU
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP170104091
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage219
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage228
local.identifier.doi10.1007/s00374-017-1247-4
dc.date.updated2020-11-23T11:50:02Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85033376857
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenanceThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http:// creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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