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Artifacts, Symbols, Thoughts

Sterelny, Kim

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Until relatively recently, it was often supposed that changes in the material record of hominin life indexed advances in hominin cognitive sophistication in a relatively direct way. In particular, the “Upper Paleolithic Transition”—an apparently abrupt increase in the complexity and disparity of our material culture—was thought to signal the arrival of the fully human mind. While the idea of a direct relationship between material complexity and cognitive sophistication still has some defenders,...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorSterelny, Kim
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-10T23:42:54Z
dc.identifier.issn1555-5542
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/232595
dc.description.abstractUntil relatively recently, it was often supposed that changes in the material record of hominin life indexed advances in hominin cognitive sophistication in a relatively direct way. In particular, the “Upper Paleolithic Transition”—an apparently abrupt increase in the complexity and disparity of our material culture—was thought to signal the arrival of the fully human mind. While the idea of a direct relationship between material complexity and cognitive sophistication still has some defenders, this view has largely been abandoned. It is now widely appreciated that aspects of ancient hominins’ demographic and social organization have a powerful influence both on the material culture they need and the material culture they can sustain. But if this more nuanced view is right (and I shall defend it), what does the deep material record tell us about the evolution of hominin cognition? I explore that question in this article.
dc.description.sponsorshipThanks to the Australian Research Council for their generous grants in support of my work on the evolution of human social life and its cognitive foundations.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag
dc.rights© Konrad Lorenz Institute for Evolution and Cognition Research 2017
dc.sourceBiological Theory
dc.titleArtifacts, Symbols, Thoughts
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
dc.date.issued2017
local.identifier.absfor220399 - Philosophy not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationu5343215xPUB102
local.publisher.urlhttps://link.springer.com/journal/13752
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationSterelny, Kim, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2099-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage236
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage247
local.identifier.doi10.1007/s13752-017-0277-3
dc.date.updated2020-11-23T10:12:20Z
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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