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Anxiety and comorbid depression following traumatic brain injury in a community-based sample of young, middle-aged and older adults

Osborn, AJ; Mathias, JL; Fairweather, Kate; Anstey, Kaarin

Description

Background Anxiety is common following a traumatic brain injury (TBI), but who is most at risk, and to what extent, is not well understood. Methods Longitudinal data from a randomly-selected community sample (Wave 1: 7397, Wave 2: 6621 and Wave 3: 6042) comprising three adult cohorts (young: 20–24 years of age, middle-aged: 40–44, older: 60–64), were analysed. The association between TBI history, anxiety and comorbid depression was assessed, controlling for age, sex, marital/employment...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorOsborn, AJ
dc.contributor.authorMathias, JL
dc.contributor.authorFairweather, Kate
dc.contributor.authorAnstey, Kaarin
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-10T01:17:14Z
dc.identifier.issn0165-0327
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/232559
dc.description.abstractBackground Anxiety is common following a traumatic brain injury (TBI), but who is most at risk, and to what extent, is not well understood. Methods Longitudinal data from a randomly-selected community sample (Wave 1: 7397, Wave 2: 6621 and Wave 3: 6042) comprising three adult cohorts (young: 20–24 years of age, middle-aged: 40–44, older: 60–64), were analysed. The association between TBI history, anxiety and comorbid depression was assessed, controlling for age, sex, marital/employment status, medical conditions, recent life events, alcohol consumption, social support and physical activity. Results Thirteen percent of the sample had sustained a TBI by Wave 3, 35% of whom had sustained multiple TBIs. Cross-sectional analyses revealed that clinically-significant anxiety was more common in people who had sustained a TBI. Longitudinal analyses demonstrated an increased risk of anxiety post-TBI, even after controlling for potential demographic, health and psychosocial confounds. Anxiety was more common than depression, although 10% of those with a TBI experienced comorbid anxiety/depression. Limitations TBIs were not medically confirmed and anxiety and depression were only assessed every four years by self-report, rather than clinical interview. Sample attrition resulted in the retention of healthier individuals at each wave. Conclusions TBIs are associated with a lifelong increased risk of experiencing clinically-significant anxiety, highlighting the chronic nature of TBI sequelae. Positive lifestyle changes (e.g., increasing physical activity, reducing alcohol consumption) may decrease the risk of anxiety problems in the early years after a TBI. Comorbid anxiety and depression was common, indicating that both should be monitored and treated.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.rights© 2016 Elsevier B.V
dc.sourceJournal of Affective Disorders
dc.subjectTraumatic brain injury
dc.subjectAnxiety
dc.subjectDepression
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectPopulation
dc.subjectLongitudinal
dc.subjectMultivariate
dc.titleAnxiety and comorbid depression following traumatic brain injury in a community-based sample of young, middle-aged and older adults
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume213
dc.date.issued2017
local.identifier.absfor110903 - Central Nervous System
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4485658xPUB52
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.elsevier.com/en-au
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationOsborn, AJ , University of Adelaide
local.contributor.affiliationMathias, JL, University of Adelaide
local.contributor.affiliationFairweather, Kate, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationAnstey, Kaarin, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.description.embargo2099-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage214
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage221
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jad.2016.09.045
dc.date.updated2020-11-23T10:11:54Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85007436566
local.identifier.thomsonID000398868300031
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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