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An adverse lipid profile and increased levels of adiposity significantly predict clinical course after a first demyelinating event

Tettey, Prudence; Simpson, Steve; Taylor, Bruce; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Lucas, Robyn; Dwyer, Terry; Kostner, Karam; Van Der Mei, Ingrid

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ABSTRACT Objective To investigate the prospective associations between adiposity and lipid-related variables and conversion to multiple sclerosis (MS), time to subsequent relapse and progression in disability. Methods A cohort of 279 participants with a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination was prospectively followed to 5-year review. Height, weight, waist and hip circumference were measured, and serum samples taken for measurement of lipids and...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorTettey, Prudence
dc.contributor.authorSimpson, Steve
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Bruce
dc.contributor.authorPonsonby, Anne-Louise
dc.contributor.authorLucas, Robyn
dc.contributor.authorDwyer, Terry
dc.contributor.authorKostner, Karam
dc.contributor.authorVan Der Mei, Ingrid
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-06T01:43:14Z
dc.identifier.issn0022-3050
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/232487
dc.description.abstractABSTRACT Objective To investigate the prospective associations between adiposity and lipid-related variables and conversion to multiple sclerosis (MS), time to subsequent relapse and progression in disability. Methods A cohort of 279 participants with a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination was prospectively followed to 5-year review. Height, weight, waist and hip circumference were measured, and serum samples taken for measurement of lipids and apolipoproteins. Survival analysis was used for conversion to MS and time to relapse, and linear regression for annualised change in disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale). Results Higher body mass index (BMI; adjusted HR (aHR): 1.22 (1.04 to 1.44) per 5 kg/m2 increase), hip circumference (aHR: 1.32 (1.12 to 1.56) per 10 cm increase) and triglyceride levels (aHR: 1.20 (1.03 to 1.40) per unit increase) were associated with increased risk of subsequent relapse, while adiposity and lipid-related measures were not associated with conversion to MS. In addition, higher BMI (β: 0.04 (0.01 to 0.07) per 5 kg/ m2 increase), hip circumference (β: 0.04 (0.02 to 0.08) per 10 cm increase), waist circumference (β: 0.04 (0.02 to 0.07) per 10 cm increase), total cholesterol to highdensity lipoprotein ratio (TC/HDL ratio; β: 0.05 (0.001 to 0.10) and non-HDL; β: 0.04 (0.001 to 0.08) at study entry) were associated with a higher subsequent annual change in disability. Conclusions Higher levels of adiposity, non-HDL and TC/HDL ratio were prospectively associated with a higher rate of disability progression, and higher adiposity and triglycerides were associated with relapse but not with conversion to MS. Improving the lipid profile and losing weight into the healthy range could reduce the accumulation of disability.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe AusLong Study was funded by a grant from the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC APP544922) .
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Group
dc.rights© Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017.
dc.sourceJournal of Neurology Neurosurgery and Psychiatry
dc.titleAn adverse lipid profile and increased levels of adiposity significantly predict clinical course after a first demyelinating event
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume88
dc.date.issued2017
local.identifier.absfor110104 - Medical Biochemistry: Lipids
local.identifier.absfor111711 - Health Information Systems (incl. Surveillance)
local.identifier.absfor111706 - Epidemiology
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB7001
local.publisher.urlhttp://jnnp.bmj.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationTettey, Prudence, University of Tasmania
local.contributor.affiliationSimpson, Steve, University of Tasmania
local.contributor.affiliationTaylor, Bruce, University of Tasmania
local.contributor.affiliationPonsonby, Anne-Louise, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute & University of Melbourne
local.contributor.affiliationLucas, Robyn, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationDwyer, Terry, Murdoch Children's Research Institute
local.contributor.affiliationKostner, Karam, The University of Queensland
local.contributor.affiliationVan Der Mei, Ingrid, University of Tasmania Menzies Research Institute
local.description.embargo2099-12-31
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/544922
local.bibliographicCitation.issue5
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage395
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage401
local.identifier.doi10.1136/jnnp-2016-315037
local.identifier.absseo920203 - Diagnostic Methods
local.identifier.absseo920204 - Evaluation of Health Outcomes
local.identifier.absseo920111 - Nervous System and Disorders
dc.date.updated2020-11-23T10:10:38Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85019028982
local.identifier.thomsonID000402734800108
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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