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Rethinking indigeneous place: Igorot identity and locality in the Philippines

McKay, Deirdre

Description

Spanish and American colonisers ascribed the identity 'Igorot' to the peoples of the northern Philippine mountains, positioning them in the 'tribal slot', somewhere between ordinary peasants and 'backward' primitives. From this marginal position, contemporary Igorot communities have been comparatively successful in formalising their entitlements to land and resources in their dealings with the Philippine State. This success depends on a discourse tying indigenous or 'tribal' culture to...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMcKay, Deirdre
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-07T22:33:22Z
dc.identifier.issn1035-8811
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/23233
dc.description.abstractSpanish and American colonisers ascribed the identity 'Igorot' to the peoples of the northern Philippine mountains, positioning them in the 'tribal slot', somewhere between ordinary peasants and 'backward' primitives. From this marginal position, contemporary Igorot communities have been comparatively successful in formalising their entitlements to land and resources in their dealings with the Philippine State. This success depends on a discourse tying indigenous or 'tribal' culture to particular places. Colonial and, now, local anthropology has been recruited to this process through the mapping of community boundaries. This has allowed groups to secure official status as 'cultural communities' and gain legal recognition of their ancestral domains. Ironically, even as ancestral domains are recognised, the municipalities that hold such domains have ceased to be bounded containers for Igorot localities, if they ever were. Participation in global indigenous networks, circular migration, and ongoing relations with emigrants overseas blur the spatial, temporal, and social boundaries of Igorot communities. Transnational flows of people, information, and value are recruited to support the essentialised versions of indigenous identity necessary for negotiations with the state. Here, I show how the specific history of the Igorot 'tribal slot' enables communities to perform essentialised indigeneity and simultaneously enact highly translocal modes of cultural reproduction.
dc.publisherAustralian Anthropological Society Inc
dc.sourceAustralian Journal of Anthropology, The
dc.titleRethinking indigeneous place: Igorot identity and locality in the Philippines
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume17
dc.date.issued2006
local.identifier.absfor160104 - Social and Cultural Anthropology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9008537xPUB25
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMcKay, Deirdre, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage291
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage306
local.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1835-9310.2006.tb00065.x
dc.date.updated2015-12-07T10:30:27Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-55349132036
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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