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Where is Thailand headed?

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In late 2011 Thais are cleaning up after devastating floods, caused by above-normal rains in the north of the country. more than 600 people have died, millions of hectares of farmland have been inundated, 20,000 factories and plants have been damaged, some never to reopen, leaving at least 1.5 million unemployed. accusations of incompetence and corruption in the management of the floodwaters and the allocation of relief funds dominate the media and the Parliament. beneath the temporary gloom,...[Show more]

dc.contributor.editorWarr, Peter
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-03T08:11:29Z
dc.date.available2021-05-03T08:11:29Z
dc.identifier.issn18375081
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/231200
dc.description.abstractIn late 2011 Thais are cleaning up after devastating floods, caused by above-normal rains in the north of the country. more than 600 people have died, millions of hectares of farmland have been inundated, 20,000 factories and plants have been damaged, some never to reopen, leaving at least 1.5 million unemployed. accusations of incompetence and corruption in the management of the floodwaters and the allocation of relief funds dominate the media and the Parliament. beneath the temporary gloom, there is good news. For the first time since September 2006, when a military coup deposed the government of Thaksin Shinawatra, the country has a leadership whose legal and electoral legitimacy is acknowledged by almost all Thais. This government has an opportunity to reduce, though presumably not eliminate, the severe polarisation of the last decade—Thaksin’s five years of government and the five years of turmoil following his removal. to do that, the government led by the Pheu Thai Party of Prime minister yingluck Shinawatra, Thaksin’s younger sister, must implement the program of populist redistribution on which it was elected and for which it has an electoral mandate. but it needs to address the country’s longer-term underlying economic and social problems as well. The contributors to this issue set the scene for thinking about the challenges ahead. most, but not all, of the essays are based on the Thailand update Conference convened at the end of September 2011 by the anu’s national Thai Studies Centre. The challenges include economic problems, some of which result from the difficulties of financing the Pheu Thai promises, but also deeper issues of competitiveness arising from the country’s outdated educational system and its ageing population. There are also problems along the borders, especially the Cambodian border, and the very different problems of the muslim-majority southern provinces bordering malaysia. meanwhile, as the six-decade reign of the 84-year-old monarch, his majesty King bhumibol adulyadej, approaches its end, uncertainty and disagreement about the royal succession cloud the future, and the law stifles public discussion about these matters. The road ahead remains uncertain. What is certain is that it will not be smooth.
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherANU Press
dc.rightsAuthor/s retain copyright
dc.sourceEast Asia Forum Quarterly
dc.titleWhere is Thailand headed?
dc.typeMagazine issue
local.identifier.citationvolume3
dc.date.issued2011-12
local.publisher.urlhttps://press.anu.edu.au/
local.type.statusMetadata only
local.bibliographicCitation.issue4
local.identifier.doi10.22459/EAFQ.03.04.2011
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access via publisher website
CollectionsANU Press (1965-Present)

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