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A re-appraisal of the spatial distribution of single and multi-moat prehistoric sites in Northeast Thailand

Scott, Glenn; O'Reilly, Dougald

Description

The circular, moated sites of Northeast Thailand are among the most readily distinguished archaeological features in prehistoric Southeast Asia via aerial survey. Seminal work analysing the distribution of these sites was undertaken by Moore, Welch and McNeill in the late 1980s and early 1990s. These studies sought to analyse spatial clustering and the relationship between elevation with site size and density. Recent research by the authors has led to the discovery of further moated sites in...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorScott, Glenn
dc.contributor.authorO'Reilly, Dougald
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-30T01:05:18Z
dc.identifier.issn2352-2267
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/231164
dc.description.abstractThe circular, moated sites of Northeast Thailand are among the most readily distinguished archaeological features in prehistoric Southeast Asia via aerial survey. Seminal work analysing the distribution of these sites was undertaken by Moore, Welch and McNeill in the late 1980s and early 1990s. These studies sought to analyse spatial clustering and the relationship between elevation with site size and density. Recent research by the authors has led to the discovery of further moated sites in Northeast Thailand thereby potentially affecting the conclusions reached by Moore, Welch and McNeill. This paper revisits Moore's original nearest neighbor analysis, including newly identified sites. Moore had concluded there was a random distribution of moated sites in her study area but the updated research clearly demonstrates clustering of moated sites in the Khorat Basin. The elevation at which settlements are located is also revealed to be correlated to the size of the sites and the density of distribution of sites in the study area. The authors argue that these results may be due to the reduced availability of water at higher elevations a finding which correlates strongly with recent evidence which links patterns of precipitation to the distribution and density of sites on the Khorat Plateau. These findings may also have implications for the interpretation of socio-political organisation of Iron Age sites in Northeast Thailand.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherElsevier B.V.
dc.rights© 2017 Elsevier Ltd.
dc.sourceArchaeological Research in Asia
dc.subjectNortheast Thailand
dc.subjectArchaeology
dc.subjectMoated sites
dc.subjectIron Age
dc.subjectLandscape
dc.titleA re-appraisal of the spatial distribution of single and multi-moat prehistoric sites in Northeast Thailand
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume11
dc.date.issued2017
local.identifier.absfor210103 - Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Americas
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB6579
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.elsevier.com/en-au
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationScott, Glenn, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationO'Reilly, Dougald, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2099-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage69
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage76
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ara.2017.05.005
dc.date.updated2020-11-23T10:07:46Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85020518528
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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