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Empirical relationships between tree fall and landscape-level amounts of logging and fire

Lindenmayer, David B.; Blanchard, Wade; Blair, David; McBurney, Lachlan; Stein, John; Banks, Samuel

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Large old trees are critically important keystone structures in forest ecosystems globally. Populations of these trees are also in rapid decline in many forest ecosystems, making it important to quantify the factors that influence their dynamics at different spatial scales. Large old trees often occur in forest landscapes also subject to fire and logging. However, the effects on the risk of collapse of large old trees of the amount of logging and fire in the surrounding landscape are not well...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorLindenmayer, David B.
dc.contributor.authorBlanchard, Wade
dc.contributor.authorBlair, David
dc.contributor.authorMcBurney, Lachlan
dc.contributor.authorStein, John
dc.contributor.authorBanks, Samuel
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-27T04:48:55Z
dc.date.available2021-04-27T04:48:55Z
dc.identifier.citationLindenmayer DB, Blanchard W, Blair D, McBurney L, Stein J, Banks SC (2018) Empirical relationships between tree fall and landscape-level amounts of logging and fire. PLoS ONE 13(2): e0193132. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal. pone.0193132
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/231029
dc.description.abstractLarge old trees are critically important keystone structures in forest ecosystems globally. Populations of these trees are also in rapid decline in many forest ecosystems, making it important to quantify the factors that influence their dynamics at different spatial scales. Large old trees often occur in forest landscapes also subject to fire and logging. However, the effects on the risk of collapse of large old trees of the amount of logging and fire in the surrounding landscape are not well understood. Using an 18-year study in the Mountain Ash (Eucalyptus regnans) forests of the Central Highlands of Victoria, we quantify relationships between the probability of collapse of large old hollow-bearing trees at a site and the amount of logging and the amount of fire in the surrounding landscape. We found the probability of collapse increased with an increasing amount of logged forest in the surrounding landscape. It also increased with a greater amount of burned area in the surrounding landscape, particularly for trees in highly advanced stages of decay. The most likely explanation for elevated tree fall with an increasing amount of logged or burned areas in the surrounding landscape is change in wind movement patterns associated with cutblocks or burned areas. Previous studies show that large old hollow-bearing trees are already at high risk of collapse in our study area. New analyses presented here indicate that additional logging operations in the surrounding landscape will further elevate that risk. Current logging prescriptions require the protection of large old hollow-bearing trees on cutblocks. We suggest that efforts to reduce the probability of collapse of large old hollow-bearing trees on unlogged sites will demand careful landscape planning to limit the amount of timber harvesting in the surrounding landscape.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by an Australian Research Council Discovery Grant DP1097170 (DBL) http://www.arc.gov.au/; the Victorian Government Department of Environment, land, water and Planning (DBL) https://www2.delwp.vic.gov.au/; Parks Victoria (DBL) http://parkweb.vic.gov.au/ Long Term Ecological Research Network (DBL) http://www.ltern.org.au/; and National Environmental Science Programme Threatened Species Recovery Hub (DBL) http://www.nespthreatenedspecies.edu.au/.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science
dc.rights© 2018 Lindenmayer et al.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourcePLOS ONE (Public Library of Science)
dc.titleEmpirical relationships between tree fall and landscape-level amounts of logging and fire
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume13
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-02-05
dc.date.issued2018-02-23
local.identifier.absfor050205 - Environmental Management
local.identifier.absfor070503 - Forestry Fire Management
local.identifier.absfor050102 - Ecosystem Function
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB9473
local.publisher.urlhttps://journals.plos.org
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationLindenmayer, David, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBlanchard, Wade, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBlair, David, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationMcBurney, Lachlan, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationStein, John, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBanks, Samuel, College of Science, ANU
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP1097170
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage12
local.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0193132
dc.date.updated2020-11-23T11:39:55Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85042554882
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenanceThis is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution License
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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