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Does heart rate predict mortality in older, low-level care residents?

Fisher, Alexander A; Davis, Michael W; Srikusalanukul, Wichat; Budge, Marc

Description

To determine whether abnormalities in heart rate (HR) were associated with long-term mortality in older, low-level care residents, 179 randomly selected persons aged 65 and older (mean, 83.2+/-7.0 [SD] years; 80% women) were prospectively assessed. At baseline, duplicate measurements of HR and blood pressure were recorded in the supine position and after standing. During the 5-year follow-up period, 97 (54%) participants died. Cox survival analysis revealed no association with total mortality...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorFisher, Alexander A
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Michael W
dc.contributor.authorSrikusalanukul, Wichat
dc.contributor.authorBudge, Marc
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-07T22:32:44Z
dc.identifier.issn1076-7460
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/22937
dc.description.abstractTo determine whether abnormalities in heart rate (HR) were associated with long-term mortality in older, low-level care residents, 179 randomly selected persons aged 65 and older (mean, 83.2+/-7.0 [SD] years; 80% women) were prospectively assessed. At baseline, duplicate measurements of HR and blood pressure were recorded in the supine position and after standing. During the 5-year follow-up period, 97 (54%) participants died. Cox survival analysis revealed no association with total mortality when resting HR was analyzed as a continuous or categoric variable (< or = 60, 61-89, and > 90 bpm). However, HR > or = 90 bpm was associated with increased risk of dying in residents who used a walking aid (relative risk, 3.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-11.30; p=0.038). Postural HR change was not associated with mortality risk. The authors concluded that resting HR and postural change in HR are not significant predictors of 5-year mortality in older, low-level care residents, except in persons using a walking aid.
dc.publisherLe Jacq Communications Inc
dc.sourceAmerican Journal of Geriatric Cardiology
dc.subjectKeywords: aged; article; body posture; female; heart rate; human; long term care; male; mortality; orthopedic equipment; physiology; proportional hazards model; residential home; survival; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Female; Heart Rate; Humans; Long-Term Care; Male; M
dc.titleDoes heart rate predict mortality in older, low-level care residents?
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume15
dc.date.issued2006
local.identifier.absfor110308 - Geriatrics and Gerontology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4324024xPUB24
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationFisher, Alexander A, Canberra Hospital
local.contributor.affiliationDavis, Michael W, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationSrikusalanukul, Wichat, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBudge, Marc, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue4
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage208
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage216
local.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1076-7460.2006.05275.x
dc.date.updated2015-12-07T10:23:33Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-33750125806
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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