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A special gift we bestow on you for being representative of us: Considering leader charisma from a self-categorization perspective

Platow, Michael; van Knippenberg, Daan; Haslam, S. Alexander; van Knippenberg, Barbara; Spears, Russell

Description

Two experiments tested hypotheses, derived from social identity and self-categorization theories, regarding the attribution of charisma to leaders. In Experiment I (N = 203), in-group prototypical leaders were attributed greater levels of charisma and were perceived to be more persuasive than in-group non-prototypical leaders. In Experiment 2 (N = 220), leaders described with in-group stereotypical characteristics were attributed relatively high levels of charisma regardless of their...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorPlatow, Michael
dc.contributor.authorvan Knippenberg, Daan
dc.contributor.authorHaslam, S. Alexander
dc.contributor.authorvan Knippenberg, Barbara
dc.contributor.authorSpears, Russell
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-07T22:31:38Z
dc.identifier.issn0144-6665
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/22843
dc.description.abstractTwo experiments tested hypotheses, derived from social identity and self-categorization theories, regarding the attribution of charisma to leaders. In Experiment I (N = 203), in-group prototypical leaders were attributed greater levels of charisma and were perceived to be more persuasive than in-group non-prototypical leaders. In Experiment 2 (N = 220), leaders described with in-group stereotypical characteristics were attributed relatively high levels of charisma regardless of their group-oriented versus exchange rhetoric. Leaders described with out-group stereotypical characteristics, however, had to employ group-oriented rhetoric to be attributed relatively high levels of charisma. We conclude that leadership emerges from being representative of 'us'; charisma may, indeed, be a special gift, but it is one bestowed on group members by group members for being representative of, rather than distinct from, the group itself.
dc.publisherThe British Psychological Society
dc.sourceBritish Journal of Social Psychology
dc.subjectKeywords: adolescent; adult; female; human; leadership; male; middle aged; persuasive communication; review; self concept; social behavior; social psychology; Adolescent; Adult; Female; Humans; Leadership; Male; Middle Aged; Persuasive Communication; Self Concept;
dc.titleA special gift we bestow on you for being representative of us: Considering leader charisma from a self-categorization perspective
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume45
dc.date.issued2006
local.identifier.absfor170113 - Social and Community Psychology
local.identifier.ariespublicationU9312950xPUB23
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationPlatow, Michael , College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationvan Knippenberg, Daan, Erasmus University
local.contributor.affiliationHaslam, S. Alexander, University of Exeter
local.contributor.affiliationvan Knippenberg, Barbara, Free University Amsterdam
local.contributor.affiliationSpears, Russell, Cardiff University
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage303
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage320
local.identifier.doi10.1348/014466605X41986
dc.date.updated2015-12-07T10:19:25Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-33746032913
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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