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Increased Rubisco content in maize mitigates chilling stress and speeds recovery

Salesse‐Smith, Coralie E.; Sharwood, Robert; Busch, Florian; Stern, David B

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Many C4 plants, including maize, perform poorly under chilling conditions. This phenomenon has been linked in part to decreased Rubisco abundance at lower temperatures. An exception to this is chilling-tolerant Miscanthus, which is able to maintain Rubisco protein content under such conditions. The goal of this study was to investigate whether increasing Rubisco content in maize could improve performance during or following chilling stress. Here, we demonstrate that transgenic lines...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorSalesse‐Smith, Coralie E.
dc.contributor.authorSharwood, Robert
dc.contributor.authorBusch, Florian
dc.contributor.authorStern, David B
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-26T02:49:51Z
dc.date.available2021-03-26T02:49:51Z
dc.identifier.issn1467-7644
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/227866
dc.description.abstractMany C4 plants, including maize, perform poorly under chilling conditions. This phenomenon has been linked in part to decreased Rubisco abundance at lower temperatures. An exception to this is chilling-tolerant Miscanthus, which is able to maintain Rubisco protein content under such conditions. The goal of this study was to investigate whether increasing Rubisco content in maize could improve performance during or following chilling stress. Here, we demonstrate that transgenic lines overexpressing Rubisco large and small subunits and the Rubisco assembly factor RAF1 (RAF1-LSSS), which have increased Rubisco content and growth under control conditions, maintain increased Rubisco content and growth during chilling stress. RAF1-LSSS plants exhibited 12% higher CO2 assimilation relative to nontransgenic controls under control growth conditions, and a 17% differential after 2 weeks of chilling stress, although assimilation rates of all genotypes were ~50% lower in chilling conditions. Chlorophyll fluorescence measurements showed RAF1-LSSS and WT plants had similar rates of photochemical quenching during chilling, suggesting Rubisco may not be the primary limiting factor that leads to poor performance in maize under chilling conditions. In contrast, RAF1-LSSS had improved photochemical quenching before and after chilling stress, suggesting that increased Rubisco may help plants recover faster from chilling conditions. Relatively increased leaf area, dry weight and plant height observed before chilling in RAF1-LSSS were also maintained during chilling. Together, these results demonstrate that an increase in Rubisco content allows maize plants to better cope with chilling stress and also improves their subsequent recovery, yet additional modifications are required to engineer chilling tolerance in maize.
dc.description.sponsorshipResearch at BTI was supported by the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative from the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, US Department of Agriculture, under award number 2016-67013-24464 to D.B.S. R.E.S. and F.A.B. were supported by the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Trans- lational Photosynthesis (CE1401000015).
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.rights©2019 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourcePlant Biotechnology Journal
dc.subjectRubisco
dc.subjectchilling stress
dc.subjectphotosynthesis
dc.subjecttransgenic
dc.subjectmaize
dc.titleIncreased Rubisco content in maize mitigates chilling stress and speeds recovery
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume18
dc.date.issued2019
local.identifier.absfor060705 - Plant Physiology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu3102795xPUB5622
local.publisher.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1467-7652
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationSalesse‐Smith, Coralie E., Cornell University
local.contributor.affiliationSharwood, Robert, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBusch, Florian, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationStern, David B, Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research
local.bibliographicCitation.issue6
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1409
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage1420
local.identifier.doi10.1111/pbi.13306
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2020-11-22T07:23:07Z
local.identifier.thomsonIDWOS:000503553600001
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenanceThis is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution License (CC BY)
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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