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On the edge in Asia

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What is happening to Asia’s edges—spatially, metaphorically, economically? This issue of the EAFQ examines the prospects of places that tend to be overlooked by many international policy specialists. These essays have been selected for their potential to illuminate Asia in four important ways. Sitting next to the region’s great powers can be tricky. Today both Myanmar and Mongolia are steering economic, political and diplomatic development alongside their giant neighbours. For Mongolia, its...[Show more]

dc.contributor.editorFarrelly, Nicholas
dc.contributor.editorNarangoa, Li
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-24T23:50:34Z
dc.date.available2021-03-24T23:50:34Z
dc.identifier.issn18375081
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/227780
dc.description.abstractWhat is happening to Asia’s edges—spatially, metaphorically, economically? This issue of the EAFQ examines the prospects of places that tend to be overlooked by many international policy specialists. These essays have been selected for their potential to illuminate Asia in four important ways. Sitting next to the region’s great powers can be tricky. Today both Myanmar and Mongolia are steering economic, political and diplomatic development alongside their giant neighbours. For Mongolia, its relationships with China and Russia have motivated a bold and inclusive foreign policy, one that has successfully cultivated new ties from western Europe to Australia. In the case of Myanmar, the post-dictatorship government is using its fresh democratic credentials to escape the suffocating embrace of China. We look to places where edges mean borders and frontiers. In Bangladesh and northeast India the management of cross-border issues is enduringly problematic. And as the tragic experience of Bhutan’s minorities show, the edge can be a profoundly unhappy place. Being on the edge in Asia also can imply a heightened sense of anxiety. Issues explored in this Quarterly—from dam developments on the Mekong and land disputes in Cambodia to the parlous security situation in Pakistan and the dangers of North Korean brinksmanship—all give extra reasons to worry. It is unclear that Asia has the institutional structures or the unanimity of purpose to support long-term solutions. Finally, at the edge we should be getting ready for the next big thing. Post-conflict development remains a major challenge in a number of countries. Vietnam has shown the way. Sri Lanka and Myanmar aspire to such success. The lessons they can all learn from the resource-rich states of central Asia should not be ignored. For now, the edges of Asia are where we can judge the early indications of the most overwhelming changes. In the countries adjacent to China and India, the 21st century will present disorderly opportunities, grave possibilities and the chance of something better.
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherANU Press
dc.rightsAuthor/s retain copyright
dc.sourceEast Asia Forum Quarterly
dc.titleOn the edge in Asia
dc.typeMagazine issue
local.identifier.citationvolume6
dc.date.issued2014-03
local.publisher.urlhttps://press.anu.edu.au/
local.type.statusMetadata only
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.identifier.doi10.22459/EAFQ.06.01.2014
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access via publisher website
CollectionsANU Press (1965-Present)

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