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Effectiveness of a Web-Based Self-Help Program for Suicidal Thinking in an Australian Community Sample: Randomized Controlled Trial

van Spijker, Bregje; Werner-Seidler, Aliza; Batterham, Philip; Mackinnon, Andrew; Calear, Alison; Gosling, John; Reynolds, Julia; Kerkhof, Ad; Solomon, Daniela; Shand, Fiona; Christensen, Helen

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Background: Treatment for suicidality can be delivered online, but evidence for its effectiveness is needed. Objective: The goal of our study was to examine the effectiveness of an online self-help intervention for suicidal thinking compared to an attention-matched control program. Methods: A 2-arm randomized controlled trial was conducted with assessment at postintervention, 6, and, 12 months. Through media and community advertizing, 418 suicidal adults were recruited to an online portal and...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorvan Spijker, Bregje
dc.contributor.authorWerner-Seidler, Aliza
dc.contributor.authorBatterham, Philip
dc.contributor.authorMackinnon, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorCalear, Alison
dc.contributor.authorGosling, John
dc.contributor.authorReynolds, Julia
dc.contributor.authorKerkhof, Ad
dc.contributor.authorSolomon, Daniela
dc.contributor.authorShand, Fiona
dc.contributor.authorChristensen, Helen
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-17T22:56:09Z
dc.date.available2021-03-17T22:56:09Z
dc.identifier.issn1438-8871
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/227249
dc.description.abstractBackground: Treatment for suicidality can be delivered online, but evidence for its effectiveness is needed. Objective: The goal of our study was to examine the effectiveness of an online self-help intervention for suicidal thinking compared to an attention-matched control program. Methods: A 2-arm randomized controlled trial was conducted with assessment at postintervention, 6, and, 12 months. Through media and community advertizing, 418 suicidal adults were recruited to an online portal and were delivered the intervention program (Living with Deadly Thoughts) or a control program (Living Well). The primary outcome was severity of suicidal thinking, assessed using the Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale. Results: Intention-to-treat analyses showed significant reductions in the severity of suicidal thinking at postintervention, 6, and 12 months. However, no overall group differences were found. Conclusions: Living with Deadly Thoughts was of no greater effectiveness than the control group. Further investigation into the conditions under which this program may be beneficial is now needed. Limitations of this trial include it being underpowered given the effect size ultimately observed, a high attrition rate, and the inability of determining suicide deaths or of verifying self-reported suicide attempts.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was supported by a grant from the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC; GNT1046317) and forms part of the program of research conducted by the NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence in Suicide Prevention (GNT1042580). The funder does not have any role or ultimate authority in the study design; collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of data; writing of the report; or the decision to submit the report for publication. AC is supported by NHMRC Early Career Fellowship 1122544. PB is supported by NHMRC Early Career Fellowship 1083311. HC is supported by NHMRC Fellowship 1056964.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherJournal of medical Internet Research
dc.rights© 2018 Bregje A. J. van Spijker, Aliza Werner-Seidler, Philip J. Batterham, Andrew Mackinnon, Alison L. Calear, John A. Gosling, Julia Reynolds, Ad J. F. M. Kerkhof, Daniela Solomon, Fiona Shand, Helen Christensen
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceJournal of Medical Internet Research
dc.subjectpsychosocial interventions
dc.subjectrandomized controlled trial
dc.subjectsuicide
dc.titleEffectiveness of a Web-Based Self-Help Program for Suicidal Thinking in an Australian Community Sample: Randomized Controlled Trial
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume20
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-10-29
dc.date.issued2018-02-14
local.identifier.absfor111714 - Mental Health
local.identifier.ariespublicationu5684624xPUB251
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.jmir.org/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationvan Spijker, Bregje, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationWerner-Seidler, Aliza, Black Dog Institute
local.contributor.affiliationBatterham, Philip, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationMackinnon, Andrew, Black Dog Institute (UNSW)
local.contributor.affiliationCalear, Alison, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationGosling, John, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationReynolds, Julia, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationKerkhof, Ad, VU University Amsterdam
local.contributor.affiliationSolomon, Daniela, Black Dog Institute
local.contributor.affiliationShand, Fiona, Black Dog Institute
local.contributor.affiliationChristensen, Helen, Black Dog Institute
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1046317
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1042580
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1122544
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1083311
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1056964
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage11
local.identifier.doi10.2196/jmir.8595
local.identifier.absseo920410 - Mental Health
dc.date.updated2020-11-23T11:39:44Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85042076038
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenanceThis is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work, first published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, is properly cited. The complete bibliographic information, a link to the original publication on http://www.jmir.org/, as well as this copyright and license information must be included.
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution License
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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