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Orchid conservation: from theory to practice

Phillips, Ryan; Reiter, Noushka; Peakall, Rodney

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Background: Given the exceptional diversity of orchids (26,000+ species), improving strategies for the conservation of orchids will benefit a vast number of taxa. Furthermore, with rapidly increasing numbers of endangered orchids, and low success rates in orchid conservation translocation programs worldwide, it is evident that our progress in understanding the biology of orchids is not yet translating into widespread effective conservation. Scope: We highlight unusual aspects of the...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Ryan
dc.contributor.authorReiter, Noushka
dc.contributor.authorPeakall, Rodney
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-16T02:53:00Z
dc.date.copyright© 2020 The Author(s)
dc.identifier.issn0305-7364
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/227207
dc.description.abstractBackground: Given the exceptional diversity of orchids (26,000+ species), improving strategies for the conservation of orchids will benefit a vast number of taxa. Furthermore, with rapidly increasing numbers of endangered orchids, and low success rates in orchid conservation translocation programs worldwide, it is evident that our progress in understanding the biology of orchids is not yet translating into widespread effective conservation. Scope: We highlight unusual aspects of the reproductive biology of orchids that can have important consequences for conservation programs such as specialisation of pollination systems, low fruit set but high seed production, and the potential for long-distance seed dispersal. Further, we discuss the importance of their reliance on mycorrhizal fungi for germination, including quantifying the incidence of specialised versus generalised mycorrhizal associations in orchids. In light of leading conservation theory and the biology of orchids, we provide recommendations for improving population management and translocation programs. Conclusions: Major gains in orchid conservation can be achieved by incorporating knowledge of ecological interactions, for both generalist and specialist species. For example, habitat management can be tailored to maintain pollinator populations, and conservation translocation sites selected based on confirmed availability of pollinators. Similarly, use of efficacious mycorrhizal fungi in propagation will increase the value of ex-situ collections, and likely increase the success of conservation translocations. Given the low genetic differentiation between populations of many orchids, experimental genetic mixing is an option to increase fitness of small populations, although caution is needed where cytotypes or floral ecotypes are present. Combining demographic data and field experiments will provide knowledge to enhance management and translocation success. Finally, high per-fruit fecundity means that orchids offer powerful but overlooked opportunities to propagate plants for experiments aimed at improving conservation outcomes. Given the uncertainty of future environmental change, experimental approaches also offer powerful ways to build more resilient populations.
dc.description.sponsorshipgrants from the Wimmera Catchment Management Authority (National Landcare Program), Department of Land Water and Primary Industry community grants, Grampians Threatened Species Hub, Saving our Species funding NSW Office of Environment and Heritage, and the Office of the threatened Species Commissioner to N.R
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherAcademic Press
dc.sourceAnnals of Botany
dc.source.urihttps://academic.oup.com/aob/article/126/3/345/5837070
dc.subjectOrchid,
dc.subjectconservation
dc.subjectgenetics
dc.subjectmycorrhiza
dc.subjectpollination
dc.subjectconservation translocations
dc.subjectreintroduction
dc.subjectrestoration
dc.subjectdemography
dc.titleOrchid conservation: from theory to practice
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume126
dc.date.issued2020-05-14
local.identifier.absfor050202 - Conservation and Biodiversity
local.identifier.absfor060703 - Plant Developmental and Reproductive Biology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9511635xPUB2068
local.publisher.urlhttps://academic.oup.com
local.type.statusAccepted Version
local.contributor.affiliationPhillips, Ryan, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationReiter, Noushka, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationPeakall, Rodney, College of Science, ANU
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DE150101720
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP150102762
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/LP110100408
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/LP130100162
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage345
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage362
local.identifier.doi10.1093/aob/mcaa093
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
local.identifier.absseo960806 - Forest and Woodlands Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
dc.date.updated2020-11-15T07:28:49Z
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancehttps://v2.sherpa.ac.uk/id/publication/310..."Author accepted manuscript can be made open access on non-commercial institutional repository after 12 month embargo" from SHERPA/RoMEO site (as at 19.4.2021)
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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