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Geographic variation in parity progression in Australia

Gray, Edith; Evans, Ann

Description

Australia has moderately high fertility compared to many Western‐industrialized countries. The current total fertility rate is around 1.88, but fertility levels are not uniform across the country. There is a distinct geographic pattern with the total fertility rate about 0.5 higher in remote and very remote Australia (2.33) compared to major cities (1.82). In this paper, we examine 2 explanations for this pattern: the compositional hypothesis and the contextual hypothesis. Using event‐history...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorGray, Edith
dc.contributor.authorEvans, Ann
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-15T23:28:16Z
dc.date.available2021-03-15T23:28:16Z
dc.identifier.citationGray E, Evans A. Geographic variation in parity progression in Australia. Popul Space Place. 2017; e2080. https://doi.org/10.1002/psp.2080
dc.identifier.issn1544-8452
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/227179
dc.description.abstractAustralia has moderately high fertility compared to many Western‐industrialized countries. The current total fertility rate is around 1.88, but fertility levels are not uniform across the country. There is a distinct geographic pattern with the total fertility rate about 0.5 higher in remote and very remote Australia (2.33) compared to major cities (1.82). In this paper, we examine 2 explanations for this pattern: the compositional hypothesis and the contextual hypothesis. Using event‐history methods with joint modelling to investigate parity progression, we find that after taking into account differences in age, country of birth, indigenous status, relationship status, education levels, and economic activity, women living in smaller towns in regional Australia are more likely to have a first, second, and third birth. Further, there is lower propensity to have a first child in inner or middle city areas that are characterized by smaller and more expensive housing than suburban or regional areas
dc.description.sponsorshipThe HILDA Project was initiated and is funded by the Australian Government Department of Social Services (DSS) and is managed by the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research (Melbourne Institute).This research is funded by the Australian Research Council (ARC) (DP150104248).
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd.
dc.rights© 2017 The Authors Population, Space and Place
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourcePopulation, Space and Place
dc.subjectAustralia
dc.subjectfertility
dc.subjectgeographical variation
dc.subjectparity progression
dc.titleGeographic variation in parity progression in Australia
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume24
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-04-06
dc.date.issued2017-06-07
local.identifier.absfor160302 - Fertility
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9802669xPUB3
local.publisher.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationGray, Edith, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationEvans, Ann, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP150104248
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage11
local.identifier.doi10.1002/psp.2080
dc.date.updated2020-11-23T11:42:30Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85020237505
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenanceThis is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution License
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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