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When policy meets the personal: general practice nurses in Australia

Pearce , Christopher; Hall, Sally; Phillips, Christine

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Objective: A significant focus of current health policy in Australia is to expand both the number and role of general practice nurses. Multiple new payment incentives have been instituted to encourage the use of practice nurses. This study explored the way these policies have framed their work. Methods: Multimethod research using observation, workspace photographs and interviews with nurses, doctors and managers collected through rapid appraisal in 25 practices in two states, followed by case...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorPearce , Christopher
dc.contributor.authorHall, Sally
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Christine
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-07T22:30:23Z
dc.identifier.issn1355-8196
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/22297
dc.description.abstractObjective: A significant focus of current health policy in Australia is to expand both the number and role of general practice nurses. Multiple new payment incentives have been instituted to encourage the use of practice nurses. This study explored the way these policies have framed their work. Methods: Multimethod research using observation, workspace photographs and interviews with nurses, doctors and managers collected through rapid appraisal in 25 practices in two states, followed by case studies of the role of nurses in seven practices over one year. Results: Many respondents reported unanticipated benefits in general practice functioning and teamwork as a result of employing a nurse, though this had not been a policy aim. Within funding constraints, nurses created new roles and manipulated old roles to fit their personal understanding of patient care. Policy initiatives targeting practice nurses are often based around tasks and system issues, rather than the personal creation of care and quality that patients require and nurses seek. Incentives in this study were targeted at both the uptake of nurses and specific nursing activities. Conclusion: Policy development and funding structures would benefit from better understanding of nurses as agents of connectivity (rather than simply as performers of tasks) as well as the nature of teamwork in practices.
dc.publisherRoyal Society of Medicine Press Ltd
dc.sourceJournal of Health Services Research and Policy
dc.subjectKeywords: article; Australia; funding; health care policy; human; normal human; nurse attitude; nurse practitioner; nursing practice; nursing role; patient care; priority journal; teamwork
dc.titleWhen policy meets the personal: general practice nurses in Australia
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume15
dc.date.issued2010
local.identifier.absfor111717 - Primary Health Care
local.identifier.ariespublicationu3841020xPUB21
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationPearce , Christopher, General medical practice
local.contributor.affiliationHall, Sally, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationPhillips, Christine, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issueSuppl 2
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage26
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage34
local.identifier.doi10.1258/jhsrp.2009.009042
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T10:20:12Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-77952297871
local.identifier.thomsonID000287562200005
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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