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Criminal organizations and resilience

Ayling, Julie

Description

Criminal organizations inhabit dynamic environments where the pressures of competition and state opposition constantly challenge their existence. To survive and prosper, they must be resilient. Little has been written about the concept of resilience in the context of illicit organizations. This article explores possible sources of resilience for criminal organizations, focusing on institutionalised gangs. Drawing on ecological and organizational literature, resilience is defined as the capacity...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorAyling, Julie
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-07T22:27:54Z
dc.identifier.issn1756-0616
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/22118
dc.description.abstractCriminal organizations inhabit dynamic environments where the pressures of competition and state opposition constantly challenge their existence. To survive and prosper, they must be resilient. Little has been written about the concept of resilience in the context of illicit organizations. This article explores possible sources of resilience for criminal organizations, focusing on institutionalised gangs. Drawing on ecological and organizational literature, resilience is defined as the capacity to absorb and withstand disruption and to adapt to change when necessary. For gangs and other criminal organizations, sources of resilience may include environmental factors and individual organizational features such as network characteristics. Resilience is not just a concept that enables criminologists to better understand the longevity of some criminal organizations; it also has implications for the strategic and operational aspects of policing such organizations, including intelligence gathering, the design of interventions and assessment of their potential unintended consequences.
dc.publisherAcademic Press
dc.sourceInternational Journal of Law, Crime and Justice
dc.titleCriminal organizations and resilience
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume37
dc.date.issued2009
local.identifier.absfor160204 - Criminological Theories
local.identifier.absfor180119 - Law and Society
local.identifier.ariespublicationU4081600xPUB20
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationAyling, Julie, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage182
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage196
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijlcj.2009.10.003
dc.date.updated2015-12-07T09:58:09Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-70549101141
local.identifier.thomsonID000207992900004
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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