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Rape and Attrition in the Legal Process: a comparative analysis of five countries

Bouhours, Brigitte; Daly, Kathleen

Description

Despite legal reforms, there has been little improvement in police, prosecutor, and court handling of rape and sexual assault. In the past 15 years in Australia, Canada, England and Wales, Scotland, and the United States, victimization surveys show that 14 percent of sexual violence victims report the offense to the police. Of these, 30 percent proceed to prosecution, 20 percent are adjudicated in court, 12.5 percent are convicted of any sexual offense, and 6.5 percent are convicted of the...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBouhours, Brigitte
dc.contributor.authorDaly, Kathleen
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-07T22:27:38Z
dc.identifier.issn0192-3234
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/21984
dc.description.abstractDespite legal reforms, there has been little improvement in police, prosecutor, and court handling of rape and sexual assault. In the past 15 years in Australia, Canada, England and Wales, Scotland, and the United States, victimization surveys show that 14 percent of sexual violence victims report the offense to the police. Of these, 30 percent proceed to prosecution, 20 percent are adjudicated in court, 12.5 percent are convicted of any sexual offense, and 6.5 percent are convicted of the original offense charged. In the past 35 years, average conviction rates have declined from 18 percent to 12.5 percent, although they have not fallen in all countries. Significant country differences are evident in how cases are handled and where in the legal process attrition is most likely. There is some good news: A victim's "good" character and credibility and stranger relations are less important than they once were in police or court outcomes. However, evidence of nonconsent (witness evidence, physical injuries to the victim, suspect's use of a weapon) continues to be important.
dc.publisherUniversity of Chicago Press
dc.sourceCrime and Justice: a review of research
dc.titleRape and Attrition in the Legal Process: a comparative analysis of five countries
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume39
dc.date.issued2010
local.identifier.absfor160299 - Criminology not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationU4964654xPUB19
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationBouhours, Brigitte, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationDaly, Kathleen , Griffith University
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage565
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage650
local.identifier.absseo940403 - Criminal Justice
dc.date.updated2015-12-07T09:55:18Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-79251626692
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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