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Bacillus cereus: Epidemiology, Virulence Factors, and Host-Pathogen Interactions

Enosi Tuipulotu, Daniel; Mathur, Anukriti; Ngo, Chinh; Man, Si Ming

Description

Bacillus cereus is an important human pathogen, and new findings have expanded our understanding of how this bacterium causes disease. B. cereus Hemolysin BL (HBL) and nonhemolytic enterotoxin (NHE) induce membrane pore formation, leading to activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, systemic inflammation, and death. Lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α factor (LITAF) and cell death-inducing P53 target 1 (CDIP1) are bona fide mammalian surface receptors of HBL. These newly...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorEnosi Tuipulotu, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorMathur, Anukriti
dc.contributor.authorNgo, Chinh
dc.contributor.authorMan, Si Ming
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-19T02:36:48Z
dc.identifier.issn0966-842X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/219768
dc.description.abstractBacillus cereus is an important human pathogen, and new findings have expanded our understanding of how this bacterium causes disease. B. cereus Hemolysin BL (HBL) and nonhemolytic enterotoxin (NHE) induce membrane pore formation, leading to activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, systemic inflammation, and death. Lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α factor (LITAF) and cell death-inducing P53 target 1 (CDIP1) are bona fide mammalian surface receptors of HBL. These newly identified toxin receptors and the NLRP3 inflammasome represent unique targets for potential future therapies against severe B. cereus infections. The toxin-producing bacterium Bacillus cereus is an important and neglected human pathogen and a common cause of food poisoning. Several toxins have been implicated in disease, including the pore-forming toxins hemolysin BL (HBL) and nonhemolytic enterotoxin (NHE). Recent work revealed that HBL binds to the mammalian surface receptors LITAF and CDIP1 and that both HBL and NHE induce potassium efflux and activate the NLRP3 inflammasome, leading to pyroptosis. These mammalian receptors, in part, contribute to inflammation and pathology. Other putative virulence factors of B. cereus include cytotoxin K, cereulide, metalloproteases, sphingomyelinase, and phospholipases. In this review, we highlight the latest progress in our understanding of B. cereus biology, epidemiology, and pathogenesis, and discuss potential new directions for research in this field.
dc.description.sponsorshipS.M.M. is supported by the Australian National University and the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia under Project Grants (APP1141504, APP1146864, APP1162103 and APP1163358) and the R.D. Wright Career Development Fellowship (APP1162025). D.E.T. and S.M.M. are supported by Therapeutic Innovation Australia. D.E.T and A.M. are supported by The Gretel and Gordon Bootes Medical Research Foundation. A.M. is supported by a John Curtin School of Medical Research International PhD scholarship
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.rights© 2020 Elsevier Ltd
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.sourceTrends in Microbiology
dc.titleBacillus cereus: Epidemiology, Virulence Factors, and Host-Pathogen Interactions
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume29
dc.date.issued2020
local.identifier.absfor110707 - Innate Immunity
local.identifier.ariespublicationu1036742xPUB55
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.elsevier.com/en-au
local.type.statusAccepted Version
local.contributor.affiliationEnosi Tuipulotu, Daniel, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationMathur, Anukriti, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationNgo, Chinh, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationMan, Si Ming, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1141504
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1146864
local.bibliographicCitation.issue5
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage458
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage471
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.tim.2020.09.003
local.identifier.absseo920108 - Immune System and Allergy
dc.date.updated2021-11-28T07:27:55Z
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancehttps://v2.sherpa.ac.uk/id/publication/23061..."The Accepted Version can be archived in an Institutional Repository. 12 Months. CC BY-NC-ND." from SHERPA/RoMEO site (as at 5/02/2021).
dc.rights.licenseCC BY-NC-ND
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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