Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Depression, stress and vascular function from childhood to adolescence: A longitudinal investigation

Olive, Lisa; Abhayaratna, Walter; Byrne, Donald; Telford, Rohan M; Berk, Michael; Telford, Richard D.

Description

Background: Psychological distress is associated with risk markers for cardiovascular disease, including increased arterial stiffness and high blood pressure, but it's unclear when these first manifest. This study aims to investigate the effect of psychosocial stress and depression on arterial stiffness and blood pressure in a cohort study of Australian children followed through to adolescence. Method: Depression and psychosocial stress in 520 young people (265 boys; M age = 11.6 y) were...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorOlive, Lisa
dc.contributor.authorAbhayaratna, Walter
dc.contributor.authorByrne, Donald
dc.contributor.authorTelford, Rohan M
dc.contributor.authorBerk, Michael
dc.contributor.authorTelford, Richard D.
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-07T04:46:32Z
dc.identifier.issn0163-8343
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/219221
dc.description.abstractBackground: Psychological distress is associated with risk markers for cardiovascular disease, including increased arterial stiffness and high blood pressure, but it's unclear when these first manifest. This study aims to investigate the effect of psychosocial stress and depression on arterial stiffness and blood pressure in a cohort study of Australian children followed through to adolescence. Method: Depression and psychosocial stress in 520 young people (265 boys; M age = 11.6 y) were assessed via the Children's Depression Inventory and Children's Stress Questionnaire respectively. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity was assessed using applanation tonometry, with further assessments of supine brachial blood pressure and percent body fat (dual x-ray absorptiometry). All measures were repeated four years later at age 16- years. Results: We found no cross-sectional or longitudinal evidence that children self-reporting higher levels of psychosocial stress or depressive symptoms had greater arterial stiffness. Children reporting an increase in depressive symptoms had an increase in diastolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure over time. An effect was also evident for pulse pressure, where higher pulse pressure was found in children with lower psychosocial stress at baseline and in children self-reporting a decrease in stress between baseline and follow-up. Conclusions: Findings from the current study contribute to the scant paediatric literature but only provide limited support for any influence of psychological factors on blood pressure. Depressive symptoms in apparently healthy adolescents may exert some influence on later risk for cardiovascular disease via increases in diastolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure, but these effects were small.
dc.description.sponsorshipSupport for this research was provided via a co-funded National Heart Foundation of Australia (https://www.heartfoundation.org.au)/ National Health and Medical Research Council (https://www.nhmrc. gov.au) Postgraduate Scholarship [GNT1056551] awarded to LO; an Australian Research Council Linkage Grant to DB; and from The Commonwealth Education Trust (New Zealand House, London, UK); (http://www.commonwealth.org.uk/) awarded to DT. Adolescent work was funded by the Canberra Hospital Salaried Staff Specialists Fund awarded to WA.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.rights© 2019 Published by Elsevier Inc.
dc.sourceGeneral Hospital Psychiatry
dc.subjectPulse wave velocity
dc.subjectArterial stiffness
dc.subjectBlood pressure
dc.subjectChildren
dc.subjectDepression
dc.subjectStress
dc.subjectAtherosclerosis
dc.subjectCardiovascular disease
dc.subjectComorbidity
dc.subjectRisk factors
dc.titleDepression, stress and vascular function from childhood to adolescence: A longitudinal investigation
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume62
dc.date.issued2020
local.identifier.absfor170101 - Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology)
local.identifier.ariespublicationu6269649xPUB407
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.elsevier.com/en-au
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationOlive, Lisa, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationAbhayaratna, Walter, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationByrne, Donald, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationTelford, Rohan M, University of Canberra
local.contributor.affiliationBerk, Michael, Deakin University
local.contributor.affiliationTelford, Richard D., University of Canberra
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1056551
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage6
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage12
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2019.10.001
local.identifier.absseo920103 - Cardiovascular System and Diseases
dc.date.updated2020-09-27T08:17:29Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85074878673
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Olive_Depression%2C_stress_and_2020.pdf251.95 kBAdobe PDFThumbnail


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator