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The role of relative deprivation in majority-culture support for multiculturalism

Leviston, Zoe; Dandy, Justine; Jetten, Jolanda; Walker, Iain

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In this paper, we investigate majority-culture attitudes to multicultural policy in Australia. Drawing on relative deprivation (RD) theory, we explore whether resistance to multicultural policies and initiatives is related to individual and/or group-based grievance claims of discrimination. To assess RD, we asked 517 Australian-born people who identified as White Australians to rate (a) levels of discrimination toward their own group, toward themselves personally as a consequence of their group...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorLeviston, Zoe
dc.contributor.authorDandy, Justine
dc.contributor.authorJetten, Jolanda
dc.contributor.authorWalker, Iain
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-22T23:18:38Z
dc.identifier.citationLeviston Z, Dandy J, Jetten J, Walker I. The role of relative deprivation in majority-culture support for multiculturalism. J Appl Soc Psychol. 2019;00:1–12. https://doi.org/10.1111/jasp.12652
dc.identifier.issn0021-9029
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/219027
dc.description.abstractIn this paper, we investigate majority-culture attitudes to multicultural policy in Australia. Drawing on relative deprivation (RD) theory, we explore whether resistance to multicultural policies and initiatives is related to individual and/or group-based grievance claims of discrimination. To assess RD, we asked 517 Australian-born people who identified as White Australians to rate (a) levels of discrimination toward their own group, toward themselves personally as a consequence of their group membership, and toward immigrants to Australia, and (b) feelings of injustice and anger associated with such discrimination. Our findings show that, while perceptions of discrimination toward majority-culture Australians are commonplace, perceptions of discrimination toward immigrants are more so. We also found that higher ratings of group-based RD of Australians relative to immigrants, but not individual deprivation relative to immigrants, predicted opposition to multicultural policies and initiatives. Moreover, perceived group-based RD mediated the link between national identification and opposition to multicultural policies. The findings highlight, for the first time, the importance of group-based grievance claims by majority-culture members in opposing or supporting multicultural policy.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by Edith Cowan University.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.rights© 2020 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
dc.sourceJournal of Applied Social Psychology
dc.source.urihttps://dx.doi.org/
dc.titleThe role of relative deprivation in majority-culture support for multiculturalism
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-12-17
dc.date.issued2020-01-16
local.identifier.absfor170113 - Social and Community Psychology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu6269649xPUB841
local.publisher.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationLeviston, Zoe, Edith Cowan University
local.contributor.affiliationDandy, Justine, Edith Cowan University
local.contributor.affiliationJetten, Jolanda, University of Queensland
local.contributor.affiliationWalker, Iain, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.description.embargo2099-12-31
local.identifier.doi10.1111/jasp.12652
local.identifier.absseo920413 - Social Structure and Health
dc.date.updated2020-09-13T08:20:47Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85078072625
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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