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Propagation of distinct Love-wave pulses from regional to teleseismic distances in continental and oceanic environments

Furumura, Takahashi; Kennett, Brian

Description

Surface waves are usually dispersive with long wave trains and steady decay of amplitude with distance. However, if the group velocity is nearly constant for a span of periods a strong pulse is produced that retains its amplitude for large distances. This situation arises for the fundamental mode of Love waves in the period band 40-500 s for crust and mantle structures with a positive gradient of S wave speed in the uppermost mantle. Such a distinct Love-wave pulse with limited dispersion...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorFurumura, Takahashi
dc.contributor.authorKennett, Brian
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-22T04:02:52Z
dc.date.available2020-12-22T04:02:52Z
dc.identifier.issn0956-540X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/219009
dc.description.abstractSurface waves are usually dispersive with long wave trains and steady decay of amplitude with distance. However, if the group velocity is nearly constant for a span of periods a strong pulse is produced that retains its amplitude for large distances. This situation arises for the fundamental mode of Love waves in the period band 40-500 s for crust and mantle structures with a positive gradient of S wave speed in the uppermost mantle. Such a distinct Love-wave pulse with limited dispersion observed at teleseismic distance is termed the G wave in honour of Gutenberg. The long-period G-wave pulse caused by large earthquakes carries a large amount of energy to substantial distances, with significant effects across the globe, for example event triggering. A similar G-type Love-wave pulse with a much shorter-period of 10-20 s is generated for crustal structures without thick sediment. Such pulses produce anomalously large ground displacement at near-regional distances with, for example an overestimate of surface wave magnitude. We investigate the generation and propagation mechanism of the G-type Lovewave pulses in the crust and upper-mantle with the analysis of observed strong motion records from the Mw 6.2 2016 Central Tottori earthquake and the Mw 9.0 2011 Off Tohoku earthquake in Japan, in conjunction with 3-D finite-difference simulation of seismic wave propagation and analysis of dispersion curves
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was conducted with support from Grants-in-Aid from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Sciences (Nos. 17K01322, 19H00807).
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherOxford University Press
dc.rights© 2020 The Author(s)
dc.sourceGeophysical Journal International
dc.subjectNumerical modelling
dc.subjectEarthquake ground motions
dc.subjectSurface waves and free oscillations
dc.subjectWave propagation
dc.titlePropagation of distinct Love-wave pulses from regional to teleseismic distances in continental and oceanic environments
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume221
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-01-11
dc.date.issued2020-01-16
local.identifier.absfor040407 - Seismology and Seismic Exploration
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB13145
local.publisher.urlhttps://academic.oup.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationFurumura, Takahashi, University of Tokyo
local.contributor.affiliationKennett, Brian, College of Science, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage665
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage682
local.identifier.doi10.1093/gji/ggaa028
local.identifier.absseo970104 - Expanding Knowledge in the Earth Sciences
dc.date.updated2020-09-13T08:19:38Z
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancehttps://v2.sherpa.ac.uk/id/publication/23320..."Published version can be made open access on insitutional repository" from SHERPA/RoMEO site (as at 22.12.20).
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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