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Mineral-melt partition coefficients and the problem of multiple substitution mechanisms: insights from the rare earths in forsterite and protoenstatite

Burnham, Antony; O'Neill, Hugh

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A trace element may substitute into a mineral by more than one substitution mechanism, complicating the thermodynamic description of its partition coefcients. In order to understand this phenomenon better, the mineral/melt partition coefcients for all 14 rare earth elements (REE) plus Y and Sc were measured experimentally for coexisting forsterite and protoenstatite in the system CaO-MgO-SiO2-Al2O3-TiO2 at 1406 °C and atmospheric pressure. For both phases, the results show these large trivalent...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBurnham, Antony
dc.contributor.authorO'Neill, Hugh
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-21T23:16:44Z
dc.identifier.issn0010-7999
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/218991
dc.description.abstractA trace element may substitute into a mineral by more than one substitution mechanism, complicating the thermodynamic description of its partition coefcients. In order to understand this phenomenon better, the mineral/melt partition coefcients for all 14 rare earth elements (REE) plus Y and Sc were measured experimentally for coexisting forsterite and protoenstatite in the system CaO-MgO-SiO2-Al2O3-TiO2 at 1406 °C and atmospheric pressure. For both phases, the results show these large trivalent cations (REE3+) replace Mg2+ on octahedral sites, but with charge-balance achieved by two diferent mechanisms: (1) cation vacancies (2 REE3+ +vacancy=3 Mg2+); and (2) substitution of Al for Si (REE3+ +Al3+ =Mg2+ +Si4+). The overall REE partition coefcient is the sum of the partition coefcients for each substitution mechanism. Because the stoichiometric control is diferent for each mechanism, the relative importance of the mechanism varies with melt composition, including the activities of both silica and alumina in the melt (amelt SiO2 and amelt AlO1.5). The coexistence of forsterite and protoenstatite fxes the silica activity, allowing the efect of amelt AlO1.5 to be separated from that of amelt SiO2. The relative importance of the two mechanisms depends strongly on the identity of the REE for forsterite, but not for protoenstatite. The results are used to test the lattice strain model: the two substitution mechanisms in forsterite imply diferent values for the Young's modulus in the Brice equation, despite the fact that the REE3+ cations likely occupy the same crystallographic site in both mechanisms, casting doubt on the physical basis of the lattice strain theory. Comparison with literature data confrms earlier observations that the activity coefcients of REE2O3 in silicate melts decrease with increasing SiO2 content of the melt, but the efect decreases with increasing atomic number, from La to Lu, and is almost negligible for Sc. The infuence of melt composition should apply to the mineral/melt REE partition coefcients of all other minerals. Recognizing that observed mineral/melt partition coefcients are often the sums of contributions from multiple substitution mechanisms, each with its own dependence on both crystal composition and the stoichiometric control from the melt composition, will improve parameterizations of the mineral/melt partition coefcients of other rockforming minerals. Partition coefcients for Na, Al, Ca, Ti, and Zr are also reported.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by Australian Research Council Laureate Fellowship FL130100066 to HO’N.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.rights© 2019 Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
dc.sourceContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology
dc.subjectPartitioning
dc.subjectLattice strain theory
dc.subjectRare earth elements
dc.subjectThermodynamics
dc.subjectPyroxene
dc.subjectOlivine
dc.titleMineral-melt partition coefficients and the problem of multiple substitution mechanisms: insights from the rare earths in forsterite and protoenstatite
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume175
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-10-18
dc.date.issued2019-11-25
local.identifier.absfor040304 - Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu6269649xPUB732
local.publisher.urlhttps://link.springer.com/
local.type.statusAccepted Version
local.contributor.affiliationBurnham, Antony, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationO'Neill, Hugh, College of Science, ANU
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FL130100066
local.bibliographicCitation.issue0010-7999
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage19
local.identifier.doi10.1007/s00410-019-1636-9
local.identifier.absseo970104 - Expanding Knowledge in the Earth Sciences
dc.date.updated2020-09-06T08:20:48Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85075514063
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancehttps://v2.sherpa.ac.uk/id/publication/7905..."Author accepted Manuscript can be made open access on institutional repository after 12 month embargo" from SHERPA/RoMEO site (as at 22.12.20).
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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