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Vital Organs

Raupach, Anna; Webb, Alexandra; Valter, Krisztina

Description

My VCCAFS project researched how animation and interactivity can create a different experience of anatomy. I did this in collaboration with Dr. Alexandra Webb and Associate Professor Krisztina Valter from the ANU Medical school. I began this project by re-animating sequences of magnetic resonance (MR) images and computed tomography (CT) scans. As my work developed, I wanted to link these depictions of internal body structures to more personal and emotive experiences of the body – for...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorRaupach, Anna
dc.contributor.authorWebb, Alexandra
dc.contributor.authorValter, Krisztina
dc.coverage.spatialANU School of Art & Design Gallery, Canberra, Australia
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-20T20:58:29Z
dc.date.available2020-12-20T20:58:29Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/218604
dc.description.abstractMy VCCAFS project researched how animation and interactivity can create a different experience of anatomy. I did this in collaboration with Dr. Alexandra Webb and Associate Professor Krisztina Valter from the ANU Medical school. I began this project by re-animating sequences of magnetic resonance (MR) images and computed tomography (CT) scans. As my work developed, I wanted to link these depictions of internal body structures to more personal and emotive experiences of the body – for example, swimming and yoga – to explore the relationship between the body as scientific information and the body as lived experience. Animating simple medical procedures such as blood tests or having a pulse taken convey how internal information is accessed from the outside. To reflect this, I have used heart rate sensors and experimental projection techniques to incorporate the viewers’ own body in the work. In 2016 I undertook a residency at the School of Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California, where I created 360-degree videos to be experienced in Virtual Reality (VR). While VR is mostly used in anatomy for simulation and education, its strength for me as an artist is to create an experience that disconnects the viewer from their usual perceptions of the body in space.
dc.format.extent1 works
dc.format.extentstop-motion animation, projection, virtual reality
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherANU School of Art Foyer Gallery
dc.sourceVice Chancellors College Arts Fellowship
dc.titleVital Organs
dc.typeCreative work
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
dc.date.issued2017-02-14
local.identifier.absfor190502 - Fine Arts (incl. Sculpture and Painting)
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4793941xPUB506
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationRaupach, Anna, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationWebb, Alexandra, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationValter, Krisztina, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.identifier.absseo950104 - The Creative Arts (incl. Graphics and Craft)
dc.date.updated2020-11-23T11:26:53Z
local.bibliographicCitation.placeofpublicationCanberra, Australia
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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