Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Progress in question the temporalities of politics support and belonging in gender-and sexually-diverse pedagogies

Cover, Rob; Rasmussen, Mary Lou; Aggleton, Peter; Marshall, Daniel

Description

In this paper, we examine some of the ways in which different approaches to the idea of progress emerge alongside competing temporalities of sexual and gender diversity and belonging in the context of public debates and discussions on the Safe Schools Coalition review (February 2016). The public debates provided an important point-of-focus for understanding the contemporary setting of support for minorities in relation to cultural belonging and inclusivity in educational settings. The paper...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorCover, Rob
dc.contributor.authorRasmussen, Mary Lou
dc.contributor.authorAggleton, Peter
dc.contributor.authorMarshall, Daniel
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-20T20:57:40Z
dc.date.available2020-12-20T20:57:40Z
dc.identifier.issn1030-4312
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/218339
dc.description.abstractIn this paper, we examine some of the ways in which different approaches to the idea of progress emerge alongside competing temporalities of sexual and gender diversity and belonging in the context of public debates and discussions on the Safe Schools Coalition review (February 2016). The public debates provided an important point-of-focus for understanding the contemporary setting of support for minorities in relation to cultural belonging and inclusivity in educational settings. The paper discusses the relationship between progress and temporality in its historical setting within Australian LGBTQ political history. We investigate three angles in which progress has been articulated in the Safe Schools debates: (1) disruptions to support as political setback to progress; (2) the view that safe support is necessary for the progress of LGBTQ ‘vulnerable’ youth within ‘developmental stages’; (c) the framing by conservative commentators that LGBTQ support curricula is a form of ‘progressive politics’ that undoes normative histories of neoliberal and conservative progress. Making use of the public debates around the Safe Schools curriculum to critique some of the ways in which progress on minority belonging for younger persons helps open the fields of meaning for alternative kinds of belonging that are produced through alternative cultural histories of marginalized subjects
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherCarfax Publishing, Taylor & Francis Group
dc.sourceContinuum: Journal of Media and Cultural Studies
dc.titleProgress in question the temporalities of politics support and belonging in gender-and sexually-diverse pedagogies
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolumeOnline
dc.date.issued2017
local.identifier.absfor169999 - Studies in Human Society not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4970190xPUB68
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationCover, Rob, The University of Western Australia
local.contributor.affiliationRasmussen, Mary Lou, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationAggleton, Peter, University of New South Wales
local.contributor.affiliationMarshall, Daniel, Deakin University
local.bibliographicCitation.issue6
local.identifier.doi10.1080/10304312.2017.1281883
local.identifier.absseo940113 - Gender and Sexualities
dc.date.updated2022-01-16T07:22:32Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85011844956
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

There are no files associated with this item.


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator