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Localized rapid warming ofWest Antarctic subsurface waters by remote winds

Spence, P.; Holmes, Ryan M; Hogg, Andrew; Griffies, S.M.; Stewart, Kial; England, Matthew

Description

The highest rates of Antarctic glacial ice mass loss are occurring to the west of the Antarctica Peninsula in regions where warming of subsurface continental shelf waters is also largest. However, the physical mechanisms responsible for this warming remain unknown. Here we show how localized changes in coastal winds off East Antarctica can produce significant subsurface temperature anomalies (>2 °C) around much of the continent. We demonstrate how coastal-trapped barotropic Kelvin waves...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorSpence, P.
dc.contributor.authorHolmes, Ryan M
dc.contributor.authorHogg, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorGriffies, S.M.
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Kial
dc.contributor.authorEngland, Matthew
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-20T20:57:12Z
dc.date.available2020-12-20T20:57:12Z
dc.identifier.issn1758-678X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/218193
dc.description.abstractThe highest rates of Antarctic glacial ice mass loss are occurring to the west of the Antarctica Peninsula in regions where warming of subsurface continental shelf waters is also largest. However, the physical mechanisms responsible for this warming remain unknown. Here we show how localized changes in coastal winds off East Antarctica can produce significant subsurface temperature anomalies (>2 °C) around much of the continent. We demonstrate how coastal-trapped barotropic Kelvin waves communicate the wind disturbance around the Antarctic coastline. The warming is focused on the western flank of the Antarctic Peninsula because the circulation induced by the coastal-trapped waves is intensified by the steep continental slope there, and because of the presence of pre-existing warm subsurface water offshore. The adjustment to the coastal-trapped waves shoals the subsurface isotherms and brings warm deep water upwards onto the continental shelf and closer to the coast. This result demonstrates the vulnerability of the West Antarctic region to a changing climate.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group
dc.sourceNature Climate Change
dc.titleLocalized rapid warming ofWest Antarctic subsurface waters by remote winds
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume7
dc.date.issued2017
local.identifier.absfor049999 - Earth Sciences not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4105856xPUB87
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationSpence, P., University of NSW
local.contributor.affiliationHolmes, Ryan M, University of New South Wales
local.contributor.affiliationHogg, Andrew, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationGriffies, S.M., NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory
local.contributor.affiliationStewart, Kial, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationEngland, Matthew, University of New South Wales
local.bibliographicCitation.issue8
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage595
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage603
local.identifier.doi10.1038/NCLIMATE3335
dc.date.updated2020-11-23T10:46:04Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85026654861
local.identifier.thomsonID000406742500021
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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