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Antimicrobial Resistance, Politics, and Practice in India

Broom, Alex; Doron, Assa

Description

India is considered the epicenter of the global antimicrobial resistance crisis, with unprecedented antimicrobial consumption, production, and �misuse.� But the story of resistance in India is complicated�emerging from intersections of industrial pharmaceutical development, rationing/purchasing of health care, policy infrastructure, and dynamics of disadvantage. What looks like rampant, escalating antimicrobial misuse and a need for tighter controls over drugs and �prescribers,� emerges as a...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBroom, Alex
dc.contributor.authorDoron, Assa
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-20T20:51:04Z
dc.date.available2020-12-20T20:51:04Z
dc.identifier.issn1049-7323
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/217651
dc.description.abstractIndia is considered the epicenter of the global antimicrobial resistance crisis, with unprecedented antimicrobial consumption, production, and �misuse.� But the story of resistance in India is complicated�emerging from intersections of industrial pharmaceutical development, rationing/purchasing of health care, policy infrastructure, and dynamics of disadvantage. What looks like rampant, escalating antimicrobial misuse and a need for tighter controls over drugs and �prescribers,� emerges as a complex social problem. These dimensions reach the bedside, although variously, with doctors in India dealing with precarious infectious disease landscapes, threats of multidrug-resistant organisms, and (pan) national imperatives for �more judicious� practices. Drawing on 24 semi-structured interviews with doctors in Hyderabad, we explore their perspectives on resistance (literal and figurative) in everyday practice, and how practices articulate intersections of power, influence, and governance. This offers broader context to reframe resistance in India as multifactorial, enacted through cultural/local practices, and irreducible to singular problems of control or regulation
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherUniversity of Utah
dc.sourceQualitative Health Research
dc.titleAntimicrobial Resistance, Politics, and Practice in India
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume30
dc.date.issued2020
local.identifier.absfor160101 - Anthropology of Development
local.identifier.absfor111799 - Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB13546
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationBroom, Alex, University of Sydney
local.contributor.affiliationDoron, Assa, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue11
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1684�1696
local.identifier.doi/10.1177/1049732320919088
dc.date.updated2020-11-22T07:18:52Z
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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