Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Ecological Drivers and Sex-Based Variation in BodySize and Shape in the Queensland Fruit Fly, Bactrocera tryoni (Diptera: Tephritidae)

Zhou, Yufei; Rodriguez, Juanita; Fisher, Nicole; Catullo, Renee

Description

The Queensland fruit fly (Bactrocera tryoni; Q-fly) is an Australian endemic horticultural pest species, which has caused enormous economic losses. It has the potential to expand its range to currently Q-fly-free areas and poses a serious threat to the Australian horticultural industry. A large number of studies have investigated the correlation between environmental factors and Q-fly development, reproduction, and expansion. However, it is still not clear how Q-fly morphological traits vary...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorZhou, Yufei
dc.contributor.authorRodriguez, Juanita
dc.contributor.authorFisher, Nicole
dc.contributor.authorCatullo, Renee
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-10T05:26:10Z
dc.date.available2020-12-10T05:26:10Z
dc.identifier.issn2075-4450
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/216801
dc.description.abstractThe Queensland fruit fly (Bactrocera tryoni; Q-fly) is an Australian endemic horticultural pest species, which has caused enormous economic losses. It has the potential to expand its range to currently Q-fly-free areas and poses a serious threat to the Australian horticultural industry. A large number of studies have investigated the correlation between environmental factors and Q-fly development, reproduction, and expansion. However, it is still not clear how Q-fly morphological traits vary with the environment. Our study focused on three morphological traits (body size, wing shape, and fluctuating asymmetry) in Q-fly samples collected from 1955 to 1965. We assessed how these traits vary by sex, and in response to latitude, environmental variables, and geographic distance. First, we found sexual dimorphism in body size and wing shape, but not in fluctuating asymmetry. Females had a larger body size but shorter and wider wings than males, which may be due to reproductive and/or locomotion differences between females and males. Secondly, the body size of Q-flies varied with latitude, which conforms to Bergmann's rule. Finally, we found Q-fly wing shape was more closely related to temperature rather than aridity, and low temperature and high aridity may lead to high asymmetry in Q-fly populations.
dc.description.sponsorshipRAC was funded by CSIRO Environomics Future Science and the ANU Centre for Biodiversity Analysis
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherMDPI Publishing
dc.rights© 2020 by the authors.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceInsects
dc.subjectfluctuating asymmetry
dc.subjectecological selection
dc.subjectsexual dimorphism
dc.subjectBergmann’s rule
dc.subjectAllen’s rule
dc.titleEcological Drivers and Sex-Based Variation in BodySize and Shape in the Queensland Fruit Fly, Bactrocera tryoni (Diptera: Tephritidae)
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume11
dc.date.issued2020
local.identifier.absfor060808 - Invertebrate Biology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9511635xPUB2066
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.mdpi.com/journal/insects
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationZhou, Yufei, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationRodriguez, Juanita, CSIRO National Research Collections
local.contributor.affiliationFisher, Nicole, CSIRO
local.contributor.affiliationCatullo, Renee, College of Science, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue6
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage15
local.identifier.doi10.3390/insects11060390
local.identifier.absseo960403 - Control of Animal Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species in Farmland, Arable Cropland and Permanent Cropland Environments
local.identifier.absseo960804 - Farmland, Arable Cropland and Permanent Cropland Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
dc.date.updated2020-07-19T08:34:05Z
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenance© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Zhou_Ecological_Drivers_and_2020.pdf876.44 kBAdobe PDFThumbnail


This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator