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Design Thinking, Design Activism, Design Study

Hynes, Maria

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In the history of altruistic efforts to correct the ills of the social body, Design Thinking is today enjoying its time in the limelight. While many designers have relegated it to a passing phase in the history of design, it continues to gain purchase in the broader public sphere, where it is increasingly celebrated as a natural evolution of design's diverse trajectories and the realisation of its moral potentials. This article offers a brief analysis of the contemporary status of the Design...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHynes, Maria
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-04T02:29:51Z
dc.date.available2020-12-04T02:29:51Z
dc.identifier.issn1449-1443
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/216699
dc.description.abstractIn the history of altruistic efforts to correct the ills of the social body, Design Thinking is today enjoying its time in the limelight. While many designers have relegated it to a passing phase in the history of design, it continues to gain purchase in the broader public sphere, where it is increasingly celebrated as a natural evolution of design's diverse trajectories and the realisation of its moral potentials. This article offers a brief analysis of the contemporary status of the Design Thinking brand and, specifically, its popular deployment toward the solution of social problems. As a peculiar form of immaterial labour, Design Thinking is increasingly reliant on the elaboration of a debt to design, as a way of mitigating the problem of the potentially non-productive privatisation of the commons. Drawing on the work of Stefano Harney and Fred Moten, I consider the implications of this for its supposed beneficiaries. I argue that, to the extent that design is recruited toward Design Thinking, figured as a model of solving social problems, it risks reproducing the dominant debt/credit logic and denying histories of unpayable debt. What I call design study, by contrast, makes 'bad debt' a principle of elaboration, thus opening the way for different ways of experiencing our mutual indebtedness.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherFibreculture Publications
dc.rights© 2019 The Authors
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceFibreculture
dc.source.urihttps://thirty.fibreculturejournal.org/fcj-224-design-thinking-design-activism-design-study/
dc.titleDesign Thinking, Design Activism, Design Study
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume30
dc.date.issued2019
local.identifier.absfor160803 - Race and Ethnic Relations
local.identifier.absfor160806 - Social Theory
local.identifier.ariespublicationu5786633xPUB2081
local.publisher.urlhttps://thirty.fibreculturejournal.org/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationHynes, Maria, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage24
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage41
local.identifier.doi10.15307/fcj.30.224.2019
local.identifier.absseo950201 - Communication Across Languages and Culture
dc.date.updated2020-07-19T08:31:26Z
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.rights.licenseCC-BY license
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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