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Antipsychotic choice: understanding shared decision-making among doctors and patients

Yeo, Vivien; Dowsey, Michelle; Alguera-Lara, Victoria; Ride, Jemimah; Lancsar, Emily; Castle, David

Description

Background: In deciding pharmacotherapy treatment, doctors have to balance the risks and benefits of treatment, and their preferences may not always align with patient preferences. Aim: A pilot study to explore decision-making regarding treatment with antipsychotic medications among doctors and patients. Methods: A discrete choice experiment (DCE), comprised of systematically structured choice tasks, in which doctors and patients were asked to trade off between attributes of antipsychotic...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorYeo, Vivien
dc.contributor.authorDowsey, Michelle
dc.contributor.authorAlguera-Lara, Victoria
dc.contributor.authorRide, Jemimah
dc.contributor.authorLancsar, Emily
dc.contributor.authorCastle, David
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-02T00:41:06Z
dc.identifier.issn0963-8237
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/216640
dc.description.abstractBackground: In deciding pharmacotherapy treatment, doctors have to balance the risks and benefits of treatment, and their preferences may not always align with patient preferences. Aim: A pilot study to explore decision-making regarding treatment with antipsychotic medications among doctors and patients. Methods: A discrete choice experiment (DCE), comprised of systematically structured choice tasks, in which doctors and patients were asked to trade off between attributes of antipsychotic medications, each described in terms of mode of administration, effectiveness (on positive and negative symptoms) and side effect profiles. Participants also ranked different factors that they consider important when choosing an antipsychotic medication. Results: 52 doctors and 49 patients completed the survey. Doctors accepted a higher risk of side effects than patients if it achieved better efficacy. Patients perceived long-acting injectables (LAIs) to be easier than taking tablets every day. Issues of embarrassment, pain and fear of needles were not rated as highly by patients, as anticipated by doctors. Conclusions: Doctors and patients demonstrated differences in decision-making about treatment with antipsychotic medications. Addressing these issues could facilitate shared decision-making, with the goal of improving patient adherence to antipsychotic medications, and thereby improve patient outcomes.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was funded via a grant from the St. Vincent’s Hospital Research Endowment Fund. In addition, Dr D. C., Dr V. Y., Dr M. D, Dr V. A. were supported by investigator-initiated grants from Lundbeck, Servier and Otsuka. Dr M. D. is supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council Career Development Fellowship (APP1122526).
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherInforma Healthcare
dc.rights© 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
dc.sourceJournal of Mental Health
dc.subjectShared-decision making
dc.subjectmedication adherence
dc.subjectantipsychotic medications
dc.subjectrecovery-oriented
dc.subjectlong acting injectable antipsychotic medications
dc.subjectdepot medication
dc.subjectdiscrete choice experiment
dc.titleAntipsychotic choice: understanding shared decision-making among doctors and patients
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume30
dc.date.issued2019
local.identifier.absfor140208 - Health Economics
local.identifier.ariespublicationu3102795xPUB4819
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.routledge.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationYeo, Vivien, St. Vincent’s Hospital
local.contributor.affiliationDowsey, Michelle, St. Vincent’s Hospital
local.contributor.affiliationAlguera-Lara, Victoria, St. Vincent’s Hospital
local.contributor.affiliationRide, Jemimah, University of Melbourne
local.contributor.affiliationLancsar, Emily, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationCastle, David, University of Melbourne
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1122526
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage8
local.identifier.doi10.1080/09638237.2019.1630719
local.identifier.absseo920208 - Health Policy Evaluation
dc.date.updated2021-11-28T07:30:10Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85068158995
local.identifier.thomsonIDWOS:000478541400001
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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