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Maintaining the strategic edge: the defence of Australia in 2015

dc.contributor.authorBall, Desmond
dc.contributor.authorCamilleri, Joseph
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Paul K.
dc.contributor.authorDibb, Paul
dc.contributor.authorDupont, Alan
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Stuart
dc.contributor.authorHeisbourg, Francois
dc.contributor.authorJans, Nick
dc.contributor.authorMak, Joon-Num
dc.contributor.authorLee, Chung Min
dc.contributor.authorO'Neill, Robert
dc.contributor.authorTaw, Jennifer
dc.contributor.authorTow, William
dc.contributor.authorViviani, Nancy
dc.contributor.authorWoodman, Stewart
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-30T23:21:47Z
dc.date.available2020-11-30T23:21:47Z
dc.identifierb20464125
dc.identifier.isbn731527666
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/216583
dc.description.abstractThe recent and continuing changes in Southeast Asia - the economic calamity in 1997-98, the overthrow of President Soeharto's New Order and the tenuous establishment of democracy, and the horrific circumstances of East Timor's independence - have disturbed Australia's security situation more seriously than anything since the 1960s, when Australia was at war (albeit covertly) with Indonesia in Borneo and had a task force in Vietnam. The rate of technological change is also unprecedented, especially in the area of information technology (IT) and its manifold applications, promising a revolution in military affairs (RMA), some aspects of which are very attractive for Australian defence planning. At the same time, the Australian Defence Force (ADF) faces the imminent prospect of 'block obsolescence' - when major platforms such as the F/A-18 Hornet multi-role fighter aircraft, the F-111 strike fighters, the P-3C Orion long-range maritime patrol aircraft, and all of the navy's surface combatants, will need to be replaced (or their tasks foregone). Addressing these issues will require the development of a sound appreciation of Australia's security environment, and of clear and coherent strategic guidance for defence force planning. The purpose of this volume is to assist and inform these processes.
dc.format.extentxxvi, 445 p. ; 21 cm
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherCanberra : Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, Australian National University, 1999.
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanberra papers on strategy and defence: No. 133
dc.rightsAuthor/s retain copyright
dc.source.urihttp://sdsc.bellschool.anu.edu.au/experts-publications/publications/3120/maintaining-strategic-edge-defence-australia-2015
dc.subject.lcshAustralia--Strategic aspects
dc.subject.lcshAustralia--Defenses
dc.subject.lcshAustralia--Military policy
dc.titleMaintaining the strategic edge: the defence of Australia in 2015
dc.typeBook
dc.date.issued1999
local.publisher.urlhttp://sdsc.bellschool.anu.edu.au
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.bibliographicCitation.placeofpublicationCanberra, Australia
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Strategic and Defence Studies Centre (SDSC)

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