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Tactile expectations and the perception of self-touch: An investigation using the rubber hand paradigm

White, Rebekah; Aimola Davies, Anne; Halleen, Terri; Davies, Martin

Description

The rubber hand paradigm is used to create the illusion of self-touch, by having the participant administer stimulation to a prosthetic hand while the Examiner, with an identical stimulus (index finger, paintbrush or stick), administers stimulation to the participant's hand. With synchronous stimulation, participants experience the compelling illusion that they are touching their own hand. In the current study, the robustness of this illusion was assessed using incongruent stimuli. The...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorWhite, Rebekah
dc.contributor.authorAimola Davies, Anne
dc.contributor.authorHalleen, Terri
dc.contributor.authorDavies, Martin
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-07T22:26:53Z
dc.identifier.issn1053-8100
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/21643
dc.description.abstractThe rubber hand paradigm is used to create the illusion of self-touch, by having the participant administer stimulation to a prosthetic hand while the Examiner, with an identical stimulus (index finger, paintbrush or stick), administers stimulation to the participant's hand. With synchronous stimulation, participants experience the compelling illusion that they are touching their own hand. In the current study, the robustness of this illusion was assessed using incongruent stimuli. The participant used the index finger of the right hand to administer stimulation to a prosthetic hand while the Examiner used a paintbrush to administer stimulation to the participant's left hand. The results indicate that this violation of tactile expectations does not diminish the illusion of self-touch. Participants experienced the illusion despite the use of incongruent stimuli, both when vision was precluded and when visual feedback provided clear evidence of the tactile mismatch.
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.sourceConsciousness and Cognition
dc.subjectKeywords: adult; article; controlled study; experience; female; hand prosthesis; human; human experiment; illusion; index finger; male; self stimulation; tactile stimulation; vision; Adolescent; Adult; Artificial Limbs; Female; Hand; Humans; Illusions; Male; Patter Body illusion; Expectation violation; Self-touch; Sensory; Tactile
dc.titleTactile expectations and the perception of self-touch: An investigation using the rubber hand paradigm
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume19
dc.date.issued2010
local.identifier.absfor170199 - Psychology not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.absfor170112 - Sensory Processes, Perception and Performance
local.identifier.ariespublicationu3094164xPUB18
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationWhite, Rebekah, University of Oxford
local.contributor.affiliationAimola Davies, Anne, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationHalleen, Terri, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationDavies, Martin, University of Oxford
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage505
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage519
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.concog.2009.08.003
local.identifier.absseo970117 - Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T09:52:09Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-77951642672
local.identifier.thomsonID000277779800001
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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