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What Generates Attention to Health in Trade Policy-Making?Lessons From Success in Tobacco Control and Access to Medicines: A Qualitative Study of Australia and the (Comprehensive and Progressive) Trans-Pacific Partnership

Townsend, Belinda; Friel, Sharon; Schram, Ashley; Baum, Fran; Labonte, Ronald

Description

Background: Despite greater attention to the nexus between trade and investment agreements and their potential impacts on public health, less is known regarding the political and governance conditions that enable or constrain attention to health issues on government trade agendas. Drawing on interviews with key stakeholders in the Australian trade domain, this article provides novel insights from policy actors into the range of factors that can enable or constrain attention to health in trade...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorTownsend, Belinda
dc.contributor.authorFriel, Sharon
dc.contributor.authorSchram, Ashley
dc.contributor.authorBaum, Fran
dc.contributor.authorLabonte, Ronald
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-25T23:37:30Z
dc.date.available2020-11-25T23:37:30Z
dc.identifier.issn2322-5939
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/216436
dc.description.abstractBackground: Despite greater attention to the nexus between trade and investment agreements and their potential impacts on public health, less is known regarding the political and governance conditions that enable or constrain attention to health issues on government trade agendas. Drawing on interviews with key stakeholders in the Australian trade domain, this article provides novel insights from policy actors into the range of factors that can enable or constrain attention to health in trade negotiations. Methods: A qualitative case study was chosen focused on Australia's participation in the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiations and the domestic agenda-setting processes that shaped the government's negotiating mandate. Process tracing via document analysis of media reporting, parliamentary records and government inquiries identified key events during Australia's participation in the TPP negotiations. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with 25 key government and non-government policy actors including Federal politicians, public servants, representatives from public interest nongovernment organisations and industry associations, and academic experts. Results: Interviews revealed that domestic concerns for protecting regulatory space for access to generic medicines and tobacco control emerged onto the Australian government's trade agenda. This contrasted with other health issues like alcohol control and nutrition and food systems that did not appear to receive attention. The analysis suggests sixteen key factors that shaped attention to these different health issues, including the strength of exporter interests; extent of political will of Trade and Health Ministers; framing of health issues; support within the major political parties; exogenous influencing events; public support; the strength of available evidence and the presence of existing domestic legislation and international treaties, among others. Conclusion: These findings aid understanding of the factors that can enable or constrain attention to health issues on government trade agendas, and offer insights for potential pathways to elevate greater attention to health in future. They provide a suite of conditions that appear to shape attention to health outside the biomedical health domain for further research in the commercial determinants of health.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the Australian NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence on the Social Determinants of Health Equity: Policy research on the social determinants of health equity (APP1078046).
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherKerman University of Medical Science
dc.rights© 2020 The Author(s); Published by Kerman University of Medical Sciences
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/ by/4.0
dc.sourceInternational Journal of Health Policy and Management
dc.subjectAgenda-Setting
dc.subjectTrade Policy
dc.subjectGovernance
dc.subjectNon-communicable Disease
dc.subjectHealth Policy
dc.titleWhat Generates Attention to Health in Trade Policy-Making?Lessons From Success in Tobacco Control and Access to Medicines: A Qualitative Study of Australia and the (Comprehensive and Progressive) Trans-Pacific Partnership
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolumeonline
dc.date.issued2020
local.identifier.absfor160510 - Public Policy
local.identifier.absfor111799 - Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationu1026210xPUB285
local.publisher.urlhttps://link.springer.com
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationTownsend, Belinda, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationFriel, Sharon, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationSchram (Grau), Ashley, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBaum, Fran, Flinders University
local.contributor.affiliationLabonte, Ronald, University of Ottawa
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1078046
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage12
local.identifier.doi10.34172/ijhpm.2020.80
local.identifier.absseo920407 - Health Protection and/or Disaster Response
local.identifier.absseo929999 - Health not elsewhere classified
dc.date.updated2021-08-01T08:26:38Z
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenance© 2020 The Author(s); Published by Kerman University of Medical Sciences. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/ by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution License
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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